Navy Drops Lawsuit Over MN Corsair | Aero-News Network
Aero-News Network
RSS icon RSS feed
podcast icon MP3 podcast
Subscribe Aero-News e-mail Newsletter Subscribe

Airborne Unlimited -- Recent Daily Episodes

Episode Date

AMA Drone Report

Airborne-Monday

Airborne-Tuesday

Airborne-Wednesday

Airborne-Thursday

Airborne-Friday

Airborne On ANN

ADR 02.13.17

Airborne 02.13.17

Airborne 02.14.17

Airborne 02.15.17

Airborne 02.16.17

Airborne 02.17.17

Airborne-HD On YouTube

ADR 02.13.17

Airborne 02.13.17

Airborne 02.14.17

Airborne 02.15.17

Airborne 02.16.17

Airborne 02.17.17

Sat, May 22, 2004

Navy Drops Lawsuit Over MN Corsair

Congressional intervention talks Navy into letting mechanic keep the wreck

Back in March, ANN told you about vintage aircraft enthusiast Lex Cralley being sued by the Navy for his actions in digging up the wreck of a Brewster F3A-1 Corsair that crashed during a training flight in 1944.

The Minneapolis Star Tribune is reporting that the Navy has yielded to congressional pressure and has agreed to allow Cralley to keep what was left of the Corsair. Sixty years after Lt. Robin C. Pennington bailed out of the aircraft during a training mission that began at MCAS Cherry Point in NC, and in which he failed, for unknown reasons, to pull the ripcord on his parachute, the issue has been settled.

Cralley, an airline ground services mechanic, decided to dig up what was left of the Corsair in Craven County, NC, in 1991. He then took it home to Minnesota, where he began the process of trying to restore it. However, the Justice Department, on behalf of the Navy, sued him in March, claiming they wanted the aircraft back. To add insult to injury, the Justice Department accused Cralley of stealing the airplane.

Rep. Walter Jones, R-(NC), found out about the lawsuit, and decided to help Cralley by asking the Navy to drop the lawsuit and let him keep the wreck. Rep. Jones said last week that Alberto Mora, the Navy's top lawyer, has agreed to do just that, much to Cralley's relief.

"It was a whole lot more work to retain the plane than to obtain it," said Cralley. He also thanked Rep. Jones for helping him to get the issue resolved in his favor. After government attorneys and a vintage aircraft appraiser inspected the wreck, Cralley was shown the draft of the congressional amendment, expected to pass the House and Senate this summer, which would cede title of the Corsair to him.

FMI: http://www.startribune.com/stories/462/4788135.html

Advertisement

More News

Airborne 02.17.17: Privatization Fight Is ON, X-37B Stays Up, TSA Arrests

Also: HeliTrak PMA, Aviation’s Next Big Fight, New KC Airport, Verifly, CFM Orders, Purdue Aviation, P&W Expansion Some of the aviation industry’s worst fears appea>[...]

Aero-News: Quote of the Day (02.19.17)

Aero-News Quote of the Day "Although our navigation algorithms can get even better, and we need to test them in many other parts of the world, this is a positive sign for Loon&rsqu>[...]

ANN's Daily Aero-Term (02.19.17): Takeoff Hold Lights (THL)

Takeoff Hold Lights (THL) The THL system is composed of in-pavement lighting in a double, longitudinal row of lights aligned either side of the runway centerline. The lights are fo>[...]

ANN's Daily Aero-Linx (02.19.17)

Aero Linx: Modification and Replacement Parts Association (MARPA) MARPA is the non-profit trade association that represents the Parts Manufacturer Approval (PMA) community. A PMA i>[...]

ANN FAQ: What Does The Airborne Partnership Initiative Mean For Your Business

Get Your Breaking News Out To The Industry A partnership between ANN and others in the aviation/aerospace industry offers more exposure, a greatly lessened strain on individual res>[...]

blog comments powered by Disqus



Advertisement

Advertisement

Podcasts

Advertisement

© 2007 - 2017 Web Development & Design by Pauli Systems, LC