NASA Changes Its Mind On CEV, CLV Launch Vehicle Engines | Aero-News Network
Aero-News Network
RSS icon RSS feed
podcast icon MP3 podcast
Subscribe Aero-News e-mail Newsletter Subscribe

Airborne Unlimited -- Recent Daily Episodes

Episode Date

Airborne Unlimited-
Monday

Airborne-Unmanned w/AUVSI-
Tuesday

Airborne Unlimited-
Wednesday

AMA Drone Report-
Thursday

Airborne Unlimited-
Friday

Airborne On ANN

Airborne 04.16.18

Airborne-UnManned 04.17.18

Airborne 04.18.18

AMA Drone Report 04.19.18

Airborne 04.20.18

Airborne-YouTube

Airborne 04.16.18

Airborne-UnManned 04.17.18

Airborne 04.18.18

AMA Drone Report 04.19.18

Airborne 04.20.18

Tue, May 30, 2006

NASA Changes Its Mind On CEV, CLV Launch Vehicle Engines

Will Use Modified Delta IV Boosters, J-2s Instead Of Shuttle Engines

It all came down to money -- the reason NASA has decided to use clusters of modified Delta IV rocket engines to propel the boosters the agency is designing to rocket the upcoming Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) into orbit -- and onto the moon -- instead of relying on less-expensive "throwaway" versions of the space shuttle's main engines.

NASA told Florida Today the agency will save nearly half the $40 million cost per engine for the modified shuttle engine -- itself a simpler version of the $80 million reusable engines currently employed on NASA's three-orbiter fleet -- by using the Delta IV powerplant.

"In the long run, the (Delta IV) will be much less expensive to own and operate," said Marshall Space Flight Center deputy director Dan Dumbacher. "Right away, we will be saving $100 million a flight just on the cost of engines."

The decision to use the Delta IV will require modifications to the Apollo-era, Saturn V-derived booster rocket NASA is relying on to launch cargo and manned crews into orbit, and onto such destinations as the moon and Mars.

For starters, the main booster used on the gigantic Cargo Launch Vehicle (or CLV, which would be sent into orbit in advance of the Crew Exploration Vehicle for a trip to the moon) will need to be widened an additional 5 1/2 feet -- to an awe-inspiring 33 feet in diameter -- in order to accommodate the five Delta IV engines, referred to individually as RS-68s.

The upper stage for both the CLV and CEV boosters was also originally intended to be powered by the shuttle-engine-derived motor... but they will now be powered instead by an upgraded version of Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne's J-2 booster.

The J-2 has seen extensive duty for NASA... it was originally used on the Saturn V booster that sent Apollo astronauts to the moon.

FMI: www.nasa.gov

Advertisement

More News

Airborne-Unmanned 04.17.18: XPO 2018, Drone Broadcasts, Airbus Inspection Drone

Also: NZ AFB Drone Incident, Police UAVs, Inaugural Drone Boot Camp, Predator 5M Flight Hours This is it! THE major unmanned exposition of the year -- AUVSI XPONENTIAL 2018 starts >[...]

Airborne 04.20.18: Continental Jet-A Seminole, SWA Fallout, NYC NIMBY's Helo's

Also: Teamsters Talk Allegiant, Coleman Young Airport, Miracle Flights, IN Av Repair Biz Cleared Piper has selected the Continental Motors CD-170 compression ignition engine fueled>[...]

AMA Drone Report 04.19.18: AMA Leadership, FAA Reauthorization, Coachella

Also: New French Regs, Drone Boot Camp, Public Safety Drone Standards, DroneShield Protects NASCAR It’s a little bit sad and yet a bit cool to see AMA make an exciting change>[...]

Airborne/Barnstorming 04.23.18: We Can Do So Much Better...

I'll Admit It... We're A Mite Frustrated, But We're ALSO Not Quitting... Ever Comments/Analysis/News/Video by ANN CEO/Editor-In-Chief, Jim Campbell We've accomplished so much over >[...]

Aero-News: Quote of the Day (04.23.18)

“More general-aviation pilots and passengers die from accidents involving loss of control in flight than any other single factor. Our goal is for these experts to discuss sol>[...]

blog comments powered by Disqus



Advertisement

Advertisement

Podcasts

Advertisement

© 2007 - 2018 Web Development & Design by Pauli Systems, LC