NTSB: Turbine Blade Fatigue Failure Behind 2006 Tour Helo Accident | Aero-News Network
Aero-News Network
RSS icon RSS feed
podcast icon MP3 podcast
Subscribe Aero-News e-mail Newsletter Subscribe

Airborne Unlimited -- Recent Daily Episodes

Episode Date

Airborne Unlimited-
Monday

Airborne-Unmanned w/AUVSI-
Tuesday

Airborne Unlimited-
Wednesday

AMA Drone Report-
Thursday

Airborne Unlimited-
Friday

Airborne On ANN

Airborne 05.14.18

Airborne-UnManned 05.15.18

Airborne 05.16.18

AMA Drone Report 05.17.18

Airborne 05.18.18

Airborne-YouTube

Airborne 05.14.18

Airborne-UnManned 05.15.18

Airborne 05.16.18

AMA Drone Report 05.17.18

Airborne 05.18.18

Thu, Jul 05, 2007

NTSB: Turbine Blade Fatigue Failure Behind 2006 Tour Helo Accident

Findings Led FAA To Reduce Blade Life Limit To 3,000 Hours

The National Transportation Safety Board has determined a fatigue failure of a turbine blade brought down a tour helicopter in Hawaii last year.

A Sunshine Helicopters Eurocopter AS350BA crash-landed onto a canopy of trees on January 10, 2006 in Maui, after departing Kahului Airport for a one hour sightseeing tour.

According to the NTSB probable cause report, the helo was coming out of Manawainui Gulch near Kaupo following a viewing of Haleakala Crater when "the helicopter vibrated, shuddered, and the low rotor rpm warning horn sounded."

The pilot entered an autorotation and set it down into a canopy of trees on its right side, according to the report. All aboard were able to lower themselves to the ground and call for help.

The NTSB investigation revealed a turbine blade from the second stage gas producer turbine had separated from the turbine wheel, a result of a fatigue fracture caused by a corrosion/oxidation pit.

As a result of this investigation, the Federal Aviation Administration and engine manufacturer Turbomeca reduced the life limit of the second stage turbine blades from 6,000 hours to 3,000 hours and implemented additional turbine inspection criteria.

The part in question in this accident had been in service 2,986 hours and had been used as a replacement part during a 2004 overhaul.

According to the Honolulu Advertiser, Sunshine Helicopters' Ross Scott said the NTSB report gives the company "a clean bill of health."

The pilot sustained a broken ankle, but his four passengers walked away without serious injury.

FMI: Read The NTSB Probable Cause Report

Advertisement

More News

Aero-News: Quote of the Day (05.20.18)

“We were honored to be selected by several airlines to create this retrofit solution for flight deck power. Our global experience in certification services is helping these a>[...]

ANN's Daily Aero-Term (05.20.18): Execute Missed Approach

Execute Missed Approach Instructions issued to a pilot making an instrument approach which means continue inbound to the missed approach point and execute the missed approach proce>[...]

ANN's Daily Aero-Linx (05.20.18)

Aero Linx: Directorate General of Civil Aviation (India) Directorate General of Civil Aviation is the regulatory body governing the safety aspects of civil aviation in India. This >[...]

ANN FAQ: Like Us On Facebook

There's A Lot To Like On ANN's Latest Social Media Site We all know how important Social Media is to a lot of people, particularly those under 30. We also know how important those >[...]

Airborne 05.16.18: OSHStar! Pipistrel, iFlightPlanner, ASTM Ice Detection

Also: BRS Parachute Rescue, Joe Nall Canceled, Mars Helicopter, Top Teen Rocket Scientists A growing presence at each year’s AirVenture Fly-Ins has been the availability of a>[...]

blog comments powered by Disqus



Advertisement

Advertisement

Podcasts

Advertisement

© 2007 - 2018 Web Development & Design by Pauli Systems, LC