Airbus Steps Up Checks Of Composite Rudder Assemblies | Aero-News Network
Aero-News Network
RSS icon RSS feed
podcast icon MP3 podcast
Subscribe Aero-News e-mail Newsletter Subscribe

Airborne Unlimited -- Recent Daily Episodes

Episode Date

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Airborne On ANN

Airborne 04.20.15

Airborne 04.21.15

Airborne 04.22.15

Airborne 04.23.15

Airborne 04.24.15

Airborne Hi-Def On YouTube

Airborne 04.20.15

Airborne 04.21.15

Airborne 04.22.15

Airborne 04.23.15

Airborne 04.24.15

Thu, Dec 20, 2007

Airbus Steps Up Checks Of Composite Rudder Assemblies

EASA Directive Applies To About 420 Aircraft

Conceding its prior recommended method to detect fatigue damage in the composite rudder assemblies of Airbus A300 and A310 aircraft may be inadequate, the European planemaker has stepped up inspections on the vertical stabilizers on about 400 of its oldest planes, as well as handful of newer A330 and A340 airliners.

The Wall Street Journal reports the stepped-up inspection program subjects the tail assemblies of the affected planes to repetitive ultrasonic and X-ray inspections, in order to find possible areas of weakness in the composite fixtures.

Delamination in the composite core of the rudder assembly of an Air Transat A310 led to an incident in which the aircraft lost nearly its entire vertical control surface (shown above and below) on a March 2005 flight between Cuba and Quebec. The aircraft was able to return to Cuba, with no injuries reported.

In the wake of that incident, the National Transportation Safety Board, FAA, and European Aviation Safety Agency called for immediate inspections of A300-series rudder assemblies, as well as continued inspections thereafter.

Based on recommendations by Airbus, EASA later issued a mandatory directive calling for the first such rudder checks to be completed within six months or 500 cycles, with some inspections repeated every 1,400 cycles -- on the low side for repetitive inspections of primary flight structures and control surfaces.

The high-tech methods called for to inspect the rudder assemblies are also a departure from Airbus' original inspection methods, which only required a visual once-over and a mechanic tapping on the rudder surface, to detect changes in tone that would indicate internal failure.

Airbus North America spokesman Clay McDonnell said the majority of the 400 A300s and A310s affected by the inspection schedule are flown by non-US carriers. Twenty A330 and A340 widebodies, assembled before Airbus changed its rudder-manufacturing process, are also affected.

FMI: www.airbus.com, www.easa.eu.int

Advertisement

More News

Airborne 04.24.15: DA62 Cert, Flt Design's C4, Sporty Transitions, 1st Flt Fight

Also: Legend Cub, Piper Orders, Postal UAVs?, IMC Club 'Brown Jacket Award', X-47B Refueling The Diamond DA62 has received its EASA Type certificate. After a sunny and warm day Wed>[...]

Airborne 04.23.15: Able Flight, Diesel Archer, RutanRC!

Also: United Bars Security Expert, Airborne Advisors, NTSB Video, Avidyne, Cessna, Airport Access Tempest Plus Marketing Group has announced support for Able Flight as a Platinum L>[...]

Aspen Avionics, True Innovators, Present SnF2015 Special Event Coverage!

SnF2015 Sponsor: Always-Innovative Aspen Avionics Aspen Avionics specializes in bringing the most advanced technology and capability into general aviation cockpits. Our products in>[...]

Amazing Amphib! Lakeland 2015 Sponsor Progressive Aerodyne Goes EVERYWHERE

Progressive Aerodyne Does it All -- Land, Sea and Sky! Explore 'no limits' living in the newly FAA certified Searey Elite Amphibious Light Sport Airplane. This distinctive aircraft>[...]

ANN's Daily Aero-Linx (04.26.15)

Aerospace Web Aerospaceweb.org is a non-profit site operated by engineers and scientists in the aerospace field. The goal of this site is to provide educational information on a va>[...]

blog comments powered by Disqus



Advertisement

Advertisement

Podcasts

Advertisement

© 2007 - 2015 Web Development & Design by Pauli Systems, LC