Dreamliner Hardware May Be Vulnerable To Cyber Attacks | Aero-News Network
Aero-News Network
RSS icon RSS feed
podcast icon MP3 podcast
Subscribe Aero-News e-mail Newsletter Subscribe

Airborne Unlimited -- Recent Daily Episodes

Episode Date

AMA Drone Report

Airborne-Monday

Airborne-Tuesday

Airborne-Wednesday

Airborne-Thursday

Airborne-Friday

Airborne-Unmanned w/AUVSI

Airborne On ANN

AMA 05.18.17

Airborne
05.22.17

Airborne
05.23.17

Airborne
05.24.17

Airborne
05.25.17

Airborne
05.19.17

Airborne-Unmanned 05.23.17

Airborne-YouTube

AMA 05.18.17

Airborne
05.22.17

Airborne
05.23.17

Airborne
05.24.17

Airborne
05.25.17

Airborne
05.19.17

Airborne-Unmanned 05.23.17

XPONENTIAL Innovation Preview -- www.allthingsunmanned.com

Thu, May 31, 2012

Dreamliner Hardware May Be Vulnerable To Cyber Attacks

Computer Chip 'Back Door' Discovered By UK Researchers

A computer chip used in Boeing's Dreamliner may be vulnerable to cyber attacks via the Internet, according to a pair of Cambridge University researchers. The two said in a draft paper published online that hackers could connect to the Actel chip, reprogram it, or cause permanent damage over the Internet.

In a report appearing in the UK newspaper The Guardian, the two researchers say they have presented their data to government agencies, but the response is classified. But Chris Woods of Quo Vadis Labs told the paper that "the real issue is the level of security that can be compromised through any back door." He said the access was easy to find and exploit.

Woods said that Actel may have included the "undocumented feature" on purpose as a way to gain additional functionality for the device, which is used for applications ranging from medical to military. He said that the access cannot be removed as it is integral to the way the chip is designed. While a cryptographic key is normally needed to access the ProASIC3 chip, the back door bypasses that security measure. If a device using the chip is connected to the Internet, Woods says it is fairly easy to access.

The chip can be found in some flight-critical hardware in the Dreamliner, as well as UAVs and other surveillance systems.

The final paper will be presented by Woods and Cambridge University's Sergei Skorobogatov at a conference in September. (Dreamliner file photo provided by Boeing)

FMI: www.cam.ac.uk

Advertisement

More News

AMA Drone Report 05.18.17: Drone-Jumping!, AMA Sightings Report, King Schools

Also: DJI Smart TV App, Huerta: Unmanned Aircraft 'Good News Story', XPONENTIAL Innovation Preview Ya had to see it to believe it... An ingenious Latvian UAS operation has pulled o>[...]

Airborne-Unmanned 05.23.17: Courts Nix Model Regs, Autonymous Flt, WATT 300

Also: King Schools Update, Kittyhawk APP, Robird And Integrated Drone Solutions, ICAO Drone Tracking The unmanned community got a bit of a jolt late last week when the US Court of >[...]

Airborne 05.24.17: Snowbird Update, New K-MAX, Spirit Pilots Express 'Regret'

Also: Kyle Franklin, FAA’s Earl Lawrence, SpaceX, Citation Longitude, ACSS ODA, Embraer JetWave, Boeing-Saudi As previously reported, the Canadian Snowbirds precision demonst>[...]

Airborne 05.23.17: Icon A5 NTSB Report, Product Certification, GE9X Testing

Also: UAL Cockpit Doors, NAHI 2017, Drone Database, Manual Flying Skills, Heli-Theft, Runway Extension, New SecAF The NTSB has released its preliminary report from an accident invo>[...]

Airborne 05.24.17: Snowbird Update, New K-MAX, Spirit Pilots Express 'Regret'

Also: Kyle Franklin, FAA’s Earl Lawrence, SpaceX, Citation Longitude, ACSS ODA, Embraer JetWave, Boeing-Saudi As previously reported, the Canadian Snowbirds precision demonst>[...]

blog comments powered by Disqus



Advertisement

Advertisement

Podcasts

Advertisement

© 2007 - 2017 Web Development & Design by Pauli Systems, LC