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Wed, Sep 13, 2017

Mosquito Pathfinder Trust Selects Avspecs To Restore Iconic Bomber

Work Will Begin Later This Year, According To The Group

The non-profit organization planning to restore a MK.IV de Havilland Mosquito has selected a New Zealand company to bring the airplane back to airworthy condition with work beginning later this year.

According to the Mosquito Pathfinder Trust website, they have chosen Avspecs Ltd, based in New Zealand for the restoration project. Avspecs has now completed 16 warbird restorations and currently has 2 projects underway. "With 3 de Havilland Mosquito aircraft projects already within its experience, Avspecs was the obvious choice for the restoration of the MK.IV we aim to return to the skies," they said on a post on the website.

The Trust's MK.IV de Havilland Mosquito was built to contract ACFT/555 by D.H. at Hatfield and was delivered to the RAF in March 1944. After acceptance it was issued to 618 Squadron at Skitten in April 1944. It moved with the unit to Wick on 9th July 1944 and again moved with the unit to Beccles on 21st August 1944. The aircraft was converted to a Highball configuration and used in evaluating the delivery of the Mini bouncing bomb. Following the cessation of hostilities the converted fleet were exported to Australia and based at RAAF Narromine. Eventually the unused fleet was sold off to local interests, and in the mid 1980’s the remains of the aircraft were acquired by the Mosquito restorer from New Zealand.

"We anticipate the restoration of the aircraft will take 33-35 months to complete," the group said. "With restoration commencing in the second half of 2017, we hope to have the aircraft delivered to the UK and ready for public display in mid 2020. We are going to share the build progress with you at every key stage along the way, and with the help and support of the British public, a de Havilland Mosquito will soon grace the skies over Britain once again."

(Image from file)

FMI: www.thewoodenwonder.org.uk

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