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Sun, Feb 21, 2021

NTSB Prelim: TL ULTRALIGHT SRO STINGSPORT

The Engine Did Not Respond To Full Throttle

Location: Hollywood, FL Accident Number: ERA21LA103
Date & Time: January 15, 2021, 11:16 Local Registration: N404N
Aircraft: TL ULTRALIGHT SRO STINGSPORT Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

On January 15, 2021, about 1116 eastern standard time, a TL Ultralight SRO StingSport airplane, N404N, was substantially damaged when it was involved in an accident near Hollywood, Florida. The pilot was not injured. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight.

According to the pilot, he arrived at North Perry Airport (HWO), Hollywood, Florida, about 1015 and he intended to conduct an 88-minute flight to The Florida Keys Marathon International Airport (MTH), Marathon, Florida. He took the cover off the airplane, conducted a preflight inspection, and engine run-up with no anomalies noted. He then taxied from the east end of the general aviation parking ramp on the northside of HWO, to runway 28R and was cleared for take-off.

After takeoff, the pilot noted the airplane’s climb rate was only 400 feet per minute (fpm), which was unusual because the airplane was quick to climb and he usually had to try and keep it from exceeding 500 fpm. As soon as he finished the thought that 400 fpm was odd, the engine began to shudder. He then radioed the air traffic control tower that he had an engine problem and was turning back, and the controller cleared the airplane to land on any runway. The pilot kept all the turns as tight as he could and within the confines of the airport perimeter as he did not want to “go down” on the surrounding streets or residential areas.

The tight turns allowed the airplane to lineup to land on runway 19R and the pilot believed that under normal  circumstances he would have had enough runway to complete the landing; however, a steep descent angle and speed resulted in a bounced landing. Although he was holding the throttle back, rather than slow down, the airplane seemed to gain speed. He applied the brakes, but the airplane was rolling fast and running out of runway. He considered shutting down the engine but elected to abort the landing.

The engine did not respond to full throttle and would not generate enough power to keep the airplane flying. He believed that the airplane “just fell out sky” as he was lining up to land on the grass area inside the airport perimeter. He did activate the airplane’s ballistic recovery system, but he believed that the airplane hit the ground with his hand on the activation handle. Afterwards, he shutoff the fuel and electrical system, and exited the airplane.

Initial examination of the airplane by a Federal Aviation Administration inspector revealed that it was substantially damaged. The wreckage was retained for further examination.

FMI: www.ntsb.gov

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