Japanese Zero Joins Wright-Pat Museum Collection | Aero-News Network
Aero-News Network
RSS icon RSS feed
podcast icon MP3 podcast
Subscribe Aero-News e-mail Newsletter Subscribe

Airborne Unlimited -- Recent Daily Episodes

Episode Date

Airborne Unlimited-
Monday

Airborne-Unmanned w/AUVSI-
Tuesday

Airborne Unlimited-
Wednesday

AMA Drone Report-
Thursday

Airborne Unlimited-
Friday

Airborne On ANN

Airborne 12.11.17

Airborne-Unmanned 12.12.17

Airborne 12.06.17

AMA Drone Report 12.07.17

Airborne 12.08.17

Airborne-YouTube

Airborne 12.11.17

Airborne-Unmanned 12.12.17

Airborne 12.06.17

AMA Drone Report 12.07.17

Airborne 12.08.17

Thu, Sep 02, 2004

Japanese Zero Joins Wright-Pat Museum Collection

The embodiment of Japanese air power and kamikaze suicide attacks during World War II, a restored Japanese Zero, returned to the US Air Force Museum in Dayton, OH.

Commercial workers recently completed a one-year restoration of the aircraft for the museum. They disassembled the aircraft to move it to the museum and reassembled the plane for permanent display after its arrival.

The A6M2 Zero bolsters an already formidable cast of World War II aircraft on display in the museum's Air Power Gallery. Widely regarded as the most famous of Japanese military aircraft, the Zero performed as the arch nemesis of Allied aircraft in the Pacific theater during the first half of the war.

"The Zero is the ultimate symbol of Japanese air power in the Pacific in World War II," said retired Maj. Gen. Charles D. Metcalf, museum director. "It participated in the attack on Pearl Harbor and was later used on kamikaze raids against Allied ships. The addition of the Zero adds a key element to the World War II storyline we present to our visitors."

The Japanese abandoned the museum's Zero in Kavieng, New Ireland, during World War II. The aircraft is marked to appear as a section leader's Zero from the Imperial Japanese Navy carrier Zuiho during the Battle of Bismarck Sea in spring 1943.

The U.S. Army Air Force's use of superior armament, innovative tactics and more capable fighters later in the war ended the Zero's dominance, officials said. With 10,815 built, the Zero was produced in larger numbers than any other Japanese aircraft during the war. [ANN Thanks Chris McGee, USAF Museum Public Affairs]

FMI: www.af.mil

Advertisement

More News

Canada Bails On Super Hornet Deal With Boeing

Will Acquire Jets From Australia Rather Than Purchase New Aircraft, Citing Trade Dispute Boeing's trade dispute with Bombardier has led the Canadian government to cancel its plans >[...]

AMA Drone Report 12.07.17: AMA Supports GoFly, ALPA v UAS, EU Drone Regs

Also: Drones Hunt Pythons, MI State Regs, Thanksgiving Drone Flying, Drone Collision Report A little outside our normal coverage responsibilities, nonetheless, we’re intrigue>[...]

Airborne-Unmanned 12.05.17: Mercedes Drone Deliveries, ALPA v UAVs, Tyndall RPAs

Also: ESA Eyes High-Altitude Aerial Platforms, Coptrz Provides UAS, Amazon Patent, UAS Integration In a global first, online orders were delivered in Zurich between September 25 an>[...]

Airborne 12.08.17: AMA Joins GoFly, Mackay Trophy Heroes, KSMO To The Rescue

Also: Orion Parachute Test, Workforce Shortage Issues, Cygnus Departs ISS, Myrtle Beach AirShow AMA has partnered with Boeing to support GoFly, an incentive competition that encour>[...]

Aero-News: Quote of the Day (12.11.17)

“What we turned in was a list of ideas that we had identified as things that might be helpful in terms of regulatory streamlining... Nobody had to twist our arms on this. We&>[...]

blog comments powered by Disqus



Advertisement

Advertisement

Podcasts

Advertisement

© 2007 - 2017 Web Development & Design by Pauli Systems, LC