Navy UAV Down In MD | Aero-News Network
Aero-News Network
RSS icon RSS feed
podcast icon MP3 podcast
Subscribe Aero-News e-mail Newsletter Subscribe

Airborne Unlimited -- Recent Daily Episodes

Episode Date

Airborne Unlimited-

Airborne-Unmanned w/AUVSI-

Airborne Unlimited-

AMA Drone Report-

Airborne Unlimited-

Airborne On ANN

Airborne 03.12.18

Airborne-UnManned 03.13.18

Airborne 03.14.18

AMA Drone Report 03.15.18

Airborne 03.16.18


Airborne 03.12.18

Airborne-UnManned 03.13.18

Airborne 03.14.18

AMA Drone Report 03.15.18

Airborne 03.16.18


Tue, Jun 12, 2012

Navy UAV Down In MD

Officials Say Aircraft Was Conducting A Routine Maintenance Flight

A Navy UAV has gone down on the Eastern Shore of Maryland, according to the Navy and the Coast Guard.

Initial reports are that the 44-foot UAV is part of the Navy's Patuxent River Naval Station's Unmanned Aviation and Strike Weapons program. The Associated Press reports that it went down just after noon Monday near Bloodsworth Island. No injuries were reported in connection with the accident.

The blog SeaWaves indicates that the UAV is one of five Global Hawk aircraft that was acquired from the Air Force for the Broad Area Maritime Surveillance Demonstrator program. The BAMS-D program has been working on employing high-altitude unmanned patrol aircraft since November, 2006.

According to the NAVAIR website, The Navy’s RQ-4A Global Hawk UAVs fly up to 60,000 feet. The high-flying aerial vehicle can operate for more than 30 hours above most weather. Imagery and other data obtained by the aircraft feeds by satellite into the Navy ground segment consisting of a mission control element, a launch and recovery element, and a Navy-designed Tactical Auxiliary Ground Station (TAGS). Flown by Navy and Navy contractor pilots, the asset is controlled from Naval Air Station (NAS) Patuxent River, MD.

BAMS-D was used to develop methods for integrating the Automatic Identification System (AIS) into Fleet operations. Experimentation using BAMS-D also benefited the Naval Sea Systems Command Ocean Surveillance Initiative and Oceanographer of the Navy office activities assessing usefulness of long-endurance, high-altitude unmanned systems in collecting Fleet-relevant meteorological data.

The Coast Guard has set up a safety zone around the marshy area where the aircraft went down in Dorchester County, MD, according to USCG Petty Officer Jonathan Lindberg. (File photo of Navy Global Hawk)



More News

Barnstorming: The Long Goodbye (Updated)

Thoughts About A Man Who Made EVERYTHING Possible for Me Grief is the price we pay for love. Queen Elizabeth II A Personal Observation By ANN/E-I-C Jim Campbell A Personal Update-0>[...]

AMA Drone Report 03.15.18: Penguins and Drones, FPV Flying, NASA Armstrong

Also: Drone Suspected In Wildfire, UAV Airspace Integration, Longest UAV Urban Pkg Delivery, Drone Locates Child For the past 40 years, the total number of Adélie Penguins, >[...]

Airborne-Unmanned 03.13.18: FAA Message, Drone Waiver, NASA Armstrong

Also: Drone Suspected In Wildfire, DroneShield, Moore County Sheriff, Camcopter S-100 Contract During the third annual FAA UAS Symposium, cosponsored by AUVSI, FAA officials said r>[...]

Airborne 03.14.18: FAA Bill Update, 'Short' Mars Flts, CA Fuel Shortage?

Also: FAA Revokes AeroBearings’ Cert, Gogo Appoints Thorne, Space Festival, Daher Names Rep For India Another contentious issue potentially blocking passage of a long-term FA>[...]

Airborne 03.16.18: Military UFO Sightings, Air Race Classic, Airshow Struggles

Also: Rostec To Build TVS-2DTS, Army Acquiring More Lakotas, Camden Spaceport Draft EIS, Lost WWII Airman Returns Are THEY out There? Really? Video captured by the crew of an F/A-1>[...]

blog comments powered by Disqus





© 2007 - 2018 Web Development & Design by Pauli Systems, LC