NEXT-C Advanced Electric Propulsion Engine Cleared To Begin Production | Aero-News Network
Aero-News Network
RSS icon RSS feed
podcast icon MP3 podcast
Subscribe Aero-News e-mail Newsletter Subscribe

Airborne Unlimited -- Recent Daily Episodes

Episode Date

Airborne Unlimited-
Monday

Airborne Unmanned-
Alt. Wednesdays

Airborne Flight Training-Alt. Wednesdays

Airborne Unlimited-
Friday

Airborne Special Programs!

Airborne On ANN

Airborne Unlimited--05.27.20

Airborne-Unmanned--05.28.20

NEW! Airborne-Flight Training--05.06.20

Airborne Unlimited--05.22.20

Airborne's Annual April 1st Episode

Airborne-YouTube

Airborne Unlimited--05.27.20

Airborne-Unmanned--05.28.20

NEW! Airborne-Flight Training--05.20.20

Airborne Unlimited--05.22.20

The 2020 Avionics Innovation Preview!

Mon, Apr 16, 2018

NEXT-C Advanced Electric Propulsion Engine Cleared To Begin Production

NASA Critical Design Review Confirms Technology Has Met Program Requirement

Aerojet Rocketdyne’s NEXT-C ion propulsion engine has successfully cleared NASA’s critical design review (CDR), confirming the technology achieved all program requirements and is ready for final production of the flight units. NASA’s Evolutionary Xenon Thruster-Commercial (NEXT-C) was developed by NASA and is being commercialized by Aerojet Rocketdyne. NEXT-C has 7kW of maximum power and greater than 4100s specific impulse (Isp). Its high Isp and flexible operational capabilities make NEXT ideal for scientific space missions.

NEXT-C will be the ion thruster used on a 2021 mission, named DART (Double Asteroid Redirection Test), led by the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory for NASA. DART is a kinetic impact mission designed to collide with a moonlet around the Didymos asteroid and slightly alter its orbit. This mission will be a critical step in demonstrating NASA’s impact threat mitigation capabilities for redirection of a potentially hazardous object such as an asteroid.

“Serving as the primary propulsion source for DART, NEXT-C will establish a precedent for future use of electric propulsion to enable ambitious future science missions,” said Eileen Drake, CEO and President of Aerojet Rocketdyne. “Electric propulsion reduces overall mission cost without sacrificing reliability or mission success.”

Under a cost-sharing agreement with NASA’s Science Mission Directorate through the agency’s Glenn Research Center, Aerojet Rocketdyne is developing the NEXT-C electric propulsion engine and power processing unit. In addition to DART, additional NEXT-C units may be launched on future NASA planetary missions.

(Source: Aerojet Rocketdyne news release. Image from file)

FMI: www.Rocket.com

Advertisement

More News

NTSB Prelim: Beech 1900

Gear Lights Showed 'Down, Locked, And Safe For Landing' On May 8, 2020, about 2050 central daylight time, a Beechcraft 1900C, N31704, sustained substantial damage when it was invol>[...]

Certification Flight Testing Commences For Black Hawk-Genesys Cockpit Suite

Certification Nearing Completion Of Modernization Of Black Hawks By XP Services Genesys Aerosystems and XP Services have commenced certification flight testing, reportedly the fina>[...]

AEA Unveils First-Quarter 2020 Avionics Market Report

Total Sales Exceed $660 Million In First Three Months Of 2020 -- 8.8% Down Over 1Q/19 The Aircraft Electronics Association released its first-quarter 2020 Avionics Market Report. I>[...]

Aero-News: Quote of the Day (05.27.20)

"The unnecessary actions of the Russian Su-35 pilots were inconsistent with good airmanship and international flight rules, and jeopardized the safety of flight of both aircraft. W>[...]

Russians Won't Play Nice... But They Do 'Stupid' Really Well

Third Unsafe Intercept by Russia in U.S. Sixth Fleet in Two Months For the third time in two months, Russian pilots flew in an unsafe and unprofessional manner while intercepting a>[...]

blog comments powered by Disqus



Advertisement

Advertisement

Podcasts

Advertisement

© 2007 - 2020 Web Development & Design by Pauli Systems, LC