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Tue, Apr 12, 2011

Flight Into Known Icing Approved for Bonanza G36

STC Granted To CAV Aerospace For FIKI System

An amended STC approval from the FAA has been granted to CAV Aerospace to install the TKS Flight Into Known Icing (FIKI) protection system in Bonanza G36 aircraft. The company is scheduling installation of the proprietary TKS system in Bonanza G36s for a base price of $47,500.


Bonanza G36

"We've been working towards obtaining FIKI approval for the G36 for a while and with more than 300 other Bonanza aircraft previously flying the TKS system, we have already integrated the work into our routine installation schedules," said CAV Aerospace President Kevin Hawley. The Bonanza G36 approval is an amendment to the STC that CAV Aerospace holds for the Bonanza A36 for flight into known icing. "Known ice protection through CAV's TKS system boosts Bonanza G36 capability and gives owners additional peace of mind," Hawley said. "Our system makes a classic high performance aircraft even more flexible. No other ice protection system, including boots or electrical heating systems, can provide the same level of protection as TKS," said Hawley. "TKS gives complete airframe protection for the wings, tail surfaces, propeller, and windshield."

The company says there is virtually no loss in aircraft performance as a result of installing the TKS system. The TKS system weighs only 51 lbs. without fluid (lighter than a boot system) and 115.4 lbs. with a full tank of fluid. A full tank of ice protection fluid provides up to 2.5 hours of continuous ice protection. As the system is used, it flushes out any accumulation of debris on the panels. Glycol, the main ingredient in the ice protection fluid, has cleaning properties and will not harm the paint finish of the aircraft.

NASA has documented the effectiveness of the TKS ice protection concept through extensive testing in the icing research tunnel at the Lewis Research Center. Hawker Beechcraft's Hawker series of mid-size business jets has used TKS ice protection as standard equipment for decades. The Bonanza G36 TKS flight into known icing system offers pilots more time to make crucial decisions when encountering icing conditions. Even with a flight into known icing TKS system, one should always take immediate steps to exit icing conditions should they be encountered.

Laser-drilled titanium panels are installed on the leading edges of the wings, horizontal and vertical stabilizers.  A slinger ring is installed on the propeller and a spray bar is positioned in front of the windshield for protection. A glycol-based fluid is pumped through the panels at a low rate. The fluid flows over the protected surfaces and keeps the aircraft virtually ice-free. The glycol-based fluid is pumped from a tank by individually selectable metering pumps, through a  microfilter to proportioning units. The proportioning units contain calibrated capillary tubes, which divide the flow to the individual needs of the porous panels and the slinger ring. The windshield is also protected by two on-demand pumps. Either pump will supply fluid to the spray bar for windshield ice protection.

CAV Aerospace says that a significant advantage to the pilot is the simple operation of the system. Just turn the system "ON" when icing is encountered and "OFF" when leaving the icing condition. Only one choice of operation exists for the pilot when using the system: NORMAL or MAXIMUM mode. Using the NORMAL mode in typical icing conditions, a protective film of glycol prevents the formation of ice. In heavier icing conditions or cases of accumulated ice, the MAXIMUM mode increases the system flow rate to shed ice. A significant feature of both modes is the elimination of runback ice.

FMI: www.cav-aerospace.net

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