Raytheon Delivers First Aircraft Self Protection Security System | Aero-News Network
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Thu, Apr 20, 2006

Raytheon Delivers First Aircraft Self Protection Security System

"Please Step Away From The Aircraft!"

Raytheon Company's Integrated Defense Systems (IDS) business recently delivered to the Air Force its first prototype Aircraft Self Protection Security System (ASPSS). The systems uses near-object detection sensor (NODS) technology to provide provides electronic perimeter security for aircraft parked on the tarmac of an airfield or in a field location.

"This aircraft self protection security system warns of potential close proximity threats to aircraft parked on the ground," said Mark Russell, Raytheon IDS vice president of Engineering.

The four-sensor version of ASPSS is a low-cost, portable system the Air Force recently accepted after tests at Eglin Air Force Base, Fla., under a $2.1 million cost-plus-fixed-fee contract administered by the Electronic Systems Center, Hanscom Air Force Base, Bedford, MA.

Raytheon also has developed a system -- the Vigilant Eagle Airport Protection System -- that protects airplanes from man-portable air defense systems threats during takeoffs and landings.

The two systems are complementary: Vigilant Eagle provides security for active aircraft, and ASPSS protects parked aircraft.

The NODS technology consists of three components: a near object detection sensor the size of a book, a communications module, and a personal digital assistant (PDA)-like alarm and display device. The near object detection sensor and communications module are mounted on a tripod and placed around the parked aircraft. The PDA-like display unit and another communication module, together known as an annunciator, are carried by security personnel. Each near object detection sensor covers approximately a 120-degree arc and is able to detect the presence of people and vehicles out to 100 meters and beyond.

Four sensors can provide overlapping 360-degree coverage of a single aircraft, and more sensors can be arranged to cover multiple aircraft parked together.

According to Russell, Raytheon IDS will be delivering a three-sensor solution to the Air Force in the near future and a multiple aircraft version in late summer.

In addition to aircraft protection, the technology shows promise for fence line, fixed facilities and commercial applications where cleared zone security is a consideration, Russell said.

FMI: www.raytheon.com

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