Four Lost In Coney Island Plane Crash | Aero-News Network
Aero-News Network
RSS icon RSS feed
podcast icon MP3 podcast
Subscribe Aero-News e-mail Newsletter Subscribe

Airborne Unlimited -- Recent Daily Episodes

Episode Date

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Airborne On ANN

Airborne 05.02.16

Airborne 05.03.16

Airborne 05.04.16

Airborne 05.05.16

Airborne 05.06.16

Airborne Hi-Def On YouTube

Airborne 05.02.16

Airborne 05.03.16

Airborne 05.04.16

Airborne 05.05.16

Airborne 05.06.16

AEA2016 LIVE Aero-TV: 04/27-0830ET, 04/28-1400ET, 04/29-1100ET

Sun 'n Fun 2016 Innovation Preview on Vimeo!

Sun 'n Fun 2016 Innovation Preview on YouTube!

Sun, May 22, 2005

Four Lost In Coney Island Plane Crash

Engine Failure Reported By Witnesses

Update 0030: The pilot of the plane was identified as Endrew F. Allen, 34, of Jamaica. He was employed as a flight instructor with Air Fleet Training Systems Inc., with locations in Teterboro and Linden, NJ. He was qualified to instruct in single and multi-engine aircraft, and had logged over 1,800 flight hours.

The aircraft had departed Linden on a "Discovery flight" with three passengers from West Virginia. Police identified the male passenger as Courtney Block, 38, of Benwood. The female passengers were Danielle Block, 18, of Benwood and Joel-Beth Marie Gross, 18, of McMechen.

A sunny afternoon at Coney Island was shattered along with the lives of four on board as a Cessna Skyhawk fell onto the beach at approximately 1330 Saturday. No injuries were reported to the few sunbathers on the beach.

Witnesses reported that the 2001 Cessna 172S (N778LP) was circling above Coney island when the engine stalled.

Herbert Lecler, who was fishing on the beach, told the AP that the pilot tried to right the airplane after 'it went into a tailspin,' but, "He couldn't, and he bounced on that beach."

Joshua McCabe, a registered nurse, was visiting from San Diego. He heard the crash and rushed over to the aircraft. Unfortunately, the pilot was already dead and a female passenger was just barely alive. He told the AP that within seconds, "she wasn't breathing and then she lost her pulse."

The aircraft is registered to to RJ Ventures LLC of Paramus, N.J. None of the victims have been identified to the public. (File Photo)

The aircraft remained on the beach about halfway between the ocean and the boardwalk with police and fire officials at the location. The beach was closed after the crash, but dozens of people watched the scene from the boardwalk.

The plane crashed onto the beach near West 19th Street, near KeySpan Park, a minor league baseball stadium.

FMI: www.ntsb.gov

Advertisement

More News

Textron Aviation Opens New Facility In Germany

Expands Line Maintenance Offering With New Bremen Site Textron Aviation has opened a new European line maintenance station in Bremen, Germany, further enhancing its service offerin>[...]

NASA Moves To Begin Historic New Era Of X-Plane Research

Supersonic Aircraft Will Be Built And Flown Over The Next 10 Years History is about to repeat itself. There have been periods of time during the past seven decades – some bus>[...]

Michigan High School Establishes Aviation Program

Classes Will Be Held At Pellston Regional Airport Alanson, Michigan Superintendent of Schools Dean Paul has established an aviation program for high school students with classes to>[...]

FAA Provides An Update At UAS Symposium

The FAA Administrator Says Progress Is Being Made On UAS Issues The FAA held a UAS Symposium in conjunction with Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University last week to broaden the dialo>[...]

FAA Approves 5,000 Section 333 Exemption Petition Grants

Gowdy Brothers Aerospace Looks To The Future Of Non-Recreational UAS Use FAA Airman and Airspace Rules Division announces 5,076 approved Section 333 petition grants. The FAA furthe>[...]

blog comments powered by Disqus



Advertisement

Advertisement

Podcasts

Advertisement

© 2007 - 2016 Web Development & Design by Pauli Systems, LC