Ares Rocket Recovery Parachute Tested Successfully | Aero-News Network
Aero-News Network
RSS icon RSS feed
podcast icon MP3 podcast
Subscribe Aero-News e-mail Newsletter Subscribe

** Airborne 08.29.14 ** HD iPad-Friendly -- Airborne 08.29.14 **
** Airborne 08.27.14 ** HD iPad-Friendly -- Airborne 08.27.14 **
** Airborne 08.25.14 ** HD iPad-Friendly -- Airborne 08.25.14 **

Tue, Mar 03, 2009

Ares Rocket Recovery Parachute Tested Successfully

Lowers First Stage Mockup Softly To Arizona Desert

NASA and industry engineers successfully completed the second drop test of a drogue parachute for the Ares I rocket. The test took place February 28 at the US Army's Yuma Proving Ground near Yuma, AZ.

The Ares I, the first launch vehicle in NASA's Constellation Program, will send explorers to the International Space Station, the moon and beyond in coming decades. The drogue parachute is a vital element of the rocket's deceleration system; it is designed to slow the rapid descent of the spent first-stage motor that will be jettisoned by the Ares I during its climb to space. The parachute will permit recovery of the reusable first-stage motor for use on future Ares I flights. The first-stage solid rocket motor will power the Ares I rocket for the first two minutes of launch.

This was the seventh in an ongoing series of flight tests supporting development of the Ares I parachute recovery system, which includes a pilot chute, drogue and three main parachutes. Researchers dropped the 68-foot-diameter drogue parachute and its 50,000-pound load, which simulates the rocket's spent first-stage motor, from a US Air Force C-17 aircraft flying at an altitude of 25,000 feet. The parachute and all test hardware functioned properly and landed safely.

The parachutes being developed for the Ares I recovery system are similar to those used for the four-segment space shuttle boosters, but they have been redesigned to accommodate new requirements of the Ares I first stage. The Ares I will have a five-segment solid rocket booster that will move faster and fall from a higher altitude than the shuttle boosters.

Engineers from NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, AL manage the team that conducted the test. ATK Launch Systems near Promontory, UT is the prime contractor for the first stage booster. ATK's subcontractor, United Space Alliance of Houston, is responsible for design, development and testing of the parachutes at its facilities at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

"The test went flawlessly and met all of our expectations," said Mike Kahn, executive vice president of ATK Space Systems. "We have a great team of individuals and subcontractors who helped ensure success of this important test, bringing us closer to full development of the new Ares I first stage."

NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston manages the Constellation Program, which includes the Ares I rocket, the Ares V heavy-lift launch vehicle, the Orion crew spacecraft and the Altair lunar lander. Marshall manages the Ares Projects. The US Army's Yuma Proving Ground provides the test range, support facilities and equipment to NASA for parachute testing.

FMI: www.nasa.gov/constellation. www.atk.com

Advertisement

More News

Annual Oshkosh 2014 'Best/Worst Of' Award Selection Invites YOUR Participation!

YOU Can Contribute To The Annual List Compiled By The Staff and Readership of the ANN and Aero-TV! E-I-C Note: We're going to start naming names and dropping details THIS week--- t>[...]

Airborne 08.29.14: Google Drone!, Cessna's 10,000th, Bearhawk LODA

Also: Big Boeing Order, Napa Tower Quaked, Landsberg Retires, Galileo Falters Breaking News! Google has unveiled an exciting new UAV project, called Project Wing, which has been un>[...]

Aero-TV: The Tecnam Juggernaut -- SeaSky, P2008, P2010, Trainers, and Astore!

An Impressive Line-Up Continues To Make A Solid Impact On Sport Aviation ANN CEO and Editor-In-Chief, Jim Campbell seized the opportunity to talk with Phil Solomon, the CEO of Tecn>[...]

AD: Bombardier, Inc. Airplanes

AD NUMBER: 2014-17-04 PRODUCT: Certain Bombardier, Inc. Model CL-600-2B19 (Regional Jet Series 100 & 440) airplanes.>[...]

ANN's Daily Aero-Linx (09.02.14)

FAA General Aviation Airports Report Beginning in 2010, the FAA began a national review of the general aviation airports resulting in two reports, General Aviation Airports: A Nati>[...]

blog comments powered by Disqus



Advertisement

Advertisement

Podcasts

Advertisement

© 2007 - 2014 Web Development & Design by Pauli Systems, LC