China Sets 2024 As Goal For Manned Moon Mission | Aero-News Network
Aero-News Network
RSS icon RSS feed
podcast icon MP3 podcast
Subscribe Aero-News e-mail Newsletter Subscribe

Airborne Unlimited -- Recent Daily Episodes

Episode Date

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Airborne On ANN

Airborne 05.23.16

Airborne 05.24.16

Airborne 05.25.16

Airborne 05.26.16

Airborne 05.27.16

Airborne Hi-Def On YouTube

Airborne 05.23.16

Airborne 05.24.16

Airborne 05.25.16

Airborne 05.26.16

Airborne 05.27.16

AEA2016 LIVE Aero-TV: 04/27-0830ET, 04/28-1400ET, 04/29-1100ET

Sun 'n Fun 2016 Innovation Preview on Vimeo!

Sun 'n Fun 2016 Innovation Preview on YouTube!

Tue, Jun 20, 2006

China Sets 2024 As Goal For Manned Moon Mission

May Mine Possible Fuel Source From Lunar Surface

As NASA looks to the stars for its future, the agency is no doubt also keeping an eye trained on countries looking to usurp the agency's lead in space travel. Take China, for example... which is waiting in the wings to match several of NASA's proudest accomplishments.

On Monday, the deputy head of China's space program, Long Lehao, declared his country will put a man on the moon by 2024.

China "possesses the technology, materials and the economic strength" to put a taikonaut on the moon, Long told the Hong Kong newspaper Wen Wei Po -- and the agency has a four-stage plan to get there.

Step one is already complete: put a man into space. Next up is stage two, which will run from 2009-2015 and will see, among other advancements, an unmanned lunar probe and China's first spacewalk.

Step three, slated for 2017, will send an unmanned robotic sample-return mission to the lunar surface... with a manned mission following seven years later.

Long added that China doesn't want to merely establish a presence on the moon, however... the country wants to profit from it, too. To that end, the Chinese National Space Administration is reportedly looking at the possibility of mining Helium-3 -- a possible non-polluting source of fuel -- from the lunar surface.

Helium-3 exists in minute quantities on Earth, but is believed to be abundant on the Moon. Analyzing lunar samples for traces of the gas will be a primary focus of China's upcoming lunar probes.

FMI: www.cnsa.gov.cn/n615708/index.html

Advertisement

More News

Toledo Police Helicopter May Be Grounded

Department Seeks Grants To Help Keep Aircraft Flying The police department in Toledo, OH may be forced to ground its helicopter unless it is able to identify a grant for the $300,0>[...]

Bill Gordon Lost In Hudson River P-47 Ditching

Despite What Appeared To Be A Decent Ditching Effort, An Outstanding Pilot Was Lost The airshow community has suffered its second tragedy in nearly as many weeks as long-time warbi>[...]

Aero-News: Quote Of The Day (05.29.16)

"Putting the world's largest satellite constellation into orbit is an enormous task and Arianespace is ideally suited to launch the initial constellation, allowing OneWeb to start >[...]

ANN FAQ: How To Get YOUR News Out On Aero-News

Good News, Bad News... It's ALL News As the preeminent online aviation news resource out there, the editorial staff at Aero-News sees a large number of news releases. We look at al>[...]

Dubai-Based Business Jet Operator Enhances In-Flight Wi-Fi Services

Empire Aviation Group Selects Honeywell Technologies For Its Entire Fleet Honeywell has signed an agreement with Empire Aviation Group to provide its full suite of GoDirect connect>[...]

blog comments powered by Disqus



Advertisement

Advertisement

Podcasts

Advertisement

© 2007 - 2016 Web Development & Design by Pauli Systems, LC