Pilot's Stolen Laptop Leads To Security Questions | Aero-News Network
Aero-News Network
RSS icon RSS feed
podcast icon MP3 podcast
Subscribe Aero-News e-mail Newsletter Subscribe

Airborne Unlimited -- Recent Daily Episodes

Episode Date

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Airborne On ANN

Airborne 06.27.16

Airborne 06.28.16

Airborne 06.29.16

Airborne 06.23.16

Airborne 06.24.16

Airborne Hi-Def On YouTube

Airborne 06.27.16

Airborne 06.28.16

Airborne 06.29.16

Airborne 06.23.16

Airborne 06.24.16

AEA2016 LIVE Aero-TV: 04/27-0830ET, 04/28-1400ET, 04/29-1100ET

Sun 'n Fun 2016 Innovation Preview on Vimeo!

Sun 'n Fun 2016 Innovation Preview on YouTube!

Sun, Apr 27, 2008

Pilot's Stolen Laptop Leads To Security Questions

Contained Ramp Codes For 17 Airports

A missing laptop, belonging to a Mesa Airlines pilot, caused a ripple effect to spread throughout numerous airports across the United States this month.

"On April 17, Mesa Airlines notified TSA that an employee reported a laptop, containing confidential information, had been misplaced, lost or stolen," a spokesperson with the Transportation Security Administration told WJLA-7.

The computer -- which may have been stolen from an overhead bin onboard a United Express flight from Birmingham, AL to Washington's Dulles International -- contained ramp access codes for as many as 17 airports... including Dulles, Atlanta, Phoenix, O'Hare, Akron-Dayton, and San Antonio.

With those codes, unauthorized personnel could gain access to an aircraft at the gate, or onto the ramp. Those codes have since been changed at the affected facilities.

When told of the incident, passengers were understandably upset. "That's just a major security breach for everyone that flies within the United States," one disgruntled flyer told the TV station.

A Mesa Airlines spokesperson -- perhaps accustomed to defending lapses in judgment on the part of a few of the carrier's pilots, including alleged cockpit naps, and stealing passengers' iPods -- noted "any breach of aviation security is of primary concern to Mesa Airlines and we are fully cooperating with the TSA."

Airline officials aren't sure if the pilot was specifically targeted for the theft, or if it was a crime of opportunity. Regardless, you'll be happy to know the TSA says it "may look at increasing the standards for anyone who stores this type of information on their computers."

Hey, we feel better now!

FMI: www.tsa.gov, www.mesa-air.com

Advertisement

More News

Airborne 06.28.16: Snowbirds At OSH16!, Tamarack EASA Cert, Final T-6B

Also: Red Arrows Cut, Aero-Calendar, FAA v Amazon, Miracle Flights, Accident Investigation, Giant Planets, Real Estate Drones The Canadian Forces Snowbirds put on one heck of a sho>[...]

AD: General Electric Company Turbofan Engines

AD NUMBER: 2016-13-05 PRODUCT: All General Electric Company (GE) GE90-76B, GE90-77B, GE90-85B, GE90-90B, and GE90-94B turbofan engines.>[...]

AD: The Boeing Company Airplanes

AD NUMBER: 2016-13-03 PRODUCT: All The Boeing Company Model 767 airplanes.>[...]

ANN's Daily Aero-Linx (06.29.16)

FAA Aircraft Certification Registration Inquiry The Aircraft Registration Inquiry database provides aircraft registration information through fourteen different queries.>[...]

ANN's Daily Aero-Term (06.29.16): Temporary Flight Restriction (TFR)

A TFR is a regulatory action issued by the FAA via the U.S. NOTAM System, under the authority of United States Code, Title 49.>[...]

blog comments powered by Disqus



Advertisement

Advertisement

Podcasts

Advertisement

© 2007 - 2016 Web Development & Design by Pauli Systems, LC