Egypt Crash: Was 737-300 Airworthy? | Aero-News Network
Aero-News Network
RSS icon RSS feed
podcast icon MP3 podcast
Subscribe Aero-News e-mail Newsletter Subscribe

** Airborne 07.23.14--CLICK HERE! ** HD iPad-Friendly Version--Airborne 07.23.14 **
** Airborne 07.21.14--CLICK HERE! ** HD iPad-Friendly Version--Airborne 07.21.14 **
** Airborne 07.18.14--CLICK HERE! ** HD iPad-Friendly Version--Airborne 07.18.14 **

Mon, Jan 05, 2004

Egypt Crash: Was 737-300 Airworthy?

Aircraft Banned In Switzerland As "Danger To Aviation Security"

The Egyptian charter company whose 737-300 crashed into the Red Sea Saturday had been banned from Switzerland because it was, in the words of Swiss officials, "a danger to aviation security."

"If a company is forbidden (to use a country's airspace)... that means the problems are serious," said Celestine Perissinotto, a spokeswoman for the Swiss Federal Office for Civil Aviation. She said the ban was instituted after civil aviation officials found a big difference between maintenance records and a physical inspection of a Flash aircraft. It's not clear at this point if it was the same 737 that went down off the Egyptian coast Saturday, killing all 148 people on board.

"The documents were not the same as the reality of the airplane that we checked," Perissinotto told Reuters, adding that the papers had been checked by the Egyptian aviation authorities.

The official news agency MENA said Egyptian Civil Aviation Minister Ahmed Mohamed Shafiq Zaki denies Swiss authorities had barred the airline from landing in Switzerland. "He said that irresponsible statements should not be made in such circumstances," MENA said.

Asked about the Swiss report, an Egyptian civil aviation official said: "All aircraft belonging to private companies are subject to regular inspections according to international rules and standards, and no plane is allowed to take off until its safety has been checked."

But Sunday, French Transport Minister Gilles de Robien told a television network in his country that Swiss officials expressed their concerns about Flash Airlines' aircraft. He said French officials had some of the same reservations, but a 2003 inspection cleared Flash. "This means that the planes appeared to be in perfectly good shape," de Robien said.

But Switzerland seemed undaunted by the bill of clean health from France. "The reaction was insufficient... The company is still banned from Switzerland," Perissinotto said.

Flash Airlines executives couldn't be reached for comment.

FMI: www.flashtour.com/airline.htm

Advertisement

More News

NBAA Establishes New Weather Subcommittee

FAA Officials On Hand For The Announcement Of The Group NBAA President and CEO Ed Bolen on Monday announced the formation of a new NBAA group focused on improvements in aviation we>[...]

U.S. House Hearing Will Examine State Of U.S. Aviation Manufacturing

Witness List Includes AEA's Blakey, GAMA's Bunce The Aviation Subcommittee of the U.S. House Transportation Committee, chaired by Congressman Frank LoBiondo (R-NJ), will hold a hea>[...]

ANN's 'Who's Who' At Oshkosh: Katherine Tryon

Introducing Staff, Stringers, Videographers, And People Who Make It All Work Anyone who's ever been to Oshkosh knows that there are hundreds of events and activities as well as ten>[...]

Appeals Court Says FAA May Not Prevent Texas EquuSearch From Using Drones

Once Again, A Federal Judges Has Ruled That The FAA Cannot Stop The Use Of Commercial Drones Unless They Are Enforcing Published Regulations ... The FAA Has A Differing Opinion Ear>[...]

ANN's Daily Aero-Linx (07.23.14)

Expert Craft Building or restoring your own airplane, or even considering a homebuilt project? This site allows you to keep a complete online log of your project, complete with not>[...]

blog comments powered by Disqus



Advertisement

Advertisement

Podcasts

Advertisement

© 2007 - 2014 Web Development & Design by Pauli Systems, LC