FAA Delays Decision On Creswell, OR, Skydiving Issue | Aero-News Network
Aero-News Network
RSS icon RSS feed
podcast icon MP3 podcast
Subscribe Aero-News e-mail Newsletter Subscribe

** Airborne 10.29.14 ** HD iPad-Friendly -- Airborne 10.29.14 **
** Airborne 10.27.14 ** HD iPad-Friendly -- Airborne 10.27.14 **
** Airborne/NBAA2014 10.24.14 ** HD iPad-Friendly -- Airborne/NBAA2014 10.24.14 **

Fri, Aug 17, 2012

FAA Delays Decision On Creswell, OR, Skydiving Issue

Operator Wants To Establish A Landing Zone At The Local Airport, City Says It's Not Safe

The FAA has kicked its decision as to whether to allow Eugene Skydivers to establish a landing zone at Hobby Field Airport (77S) in Creswell, OR, down the road at least another 120 days. In a letter dated August 3rd, Randall Fiertz, the FAA's director of Airport Compliance and Management Analysis, wrote "An extension of time is necessary and appropriate for a fair and complete determination in this case."

Not that plenty of time hasn't passed. The Creswell Chronicle reports that the City of Creswell and Eugene Skydivers have butted heads for years over the use of the airport by landing skydivers. The skydiving company's owner and operator Urban Moore filed an FAA part 16 complaint against the City of Creswell and the Creswell Hobby Field in December 2011. The complaint was filed to "restore landing rights for skydivers at the Creswell Airport."

The part 16 complaint stems from a 2006 disagreement over landing rights for skydivers at the Creswell Airport. The dispute affects where skydivers land their parachutes and reduced Eugene Skydivers business operation to tandem skydiving only. An alternate landing site, located near Seavey Loop Road in Eugene, is currently being used until this issue is resolved. If the FAA affirms the rights of skydivers to land on the airport then full operations is expected to resume later this year.

A ruling was expected to be announced this month, but the FAA now says it will come early in November. Moore said in a news release in June that the decision is expected to have national implications because it will set a precedent for cases involving airport access for skydiving activities on federally assisted airports.
 
The paper reports that in February, the city council voted to "vigorously defend" its self against the suit, and allocated up to $100,000 to hire a law firm to handle the case. It has already burned up that money, and the case remains unresolved.

FMI: www.ci.creswell.or.us, www.skydiveoregon.com

Advertisement

More News

Airborne 10.29.14: Antares Launch Failure, GAMA Responds, Another 'Roadable'???

Also: Dragon Returns, Quadcopter Flown At Airliner?, Classic Aero-TV: Redhawk, Diesel Flt School Airplanes, WWII Bomber Found The unmanned Antares rocket built by Orbital Science C>[...]

Classic Aero-TV: ‘Have it Your Way!’ – The SPA Panther

A New Single-Seat SportPlane Shows Great Potential For Serious Fun While at the Sport Aviation Expo 2014, ANN CEO and Editor-In-Chief, Jim Campbell stopped by to talk with Dan Wese>[...]

AD: Bombardier, Inc. Airplanes

AD NUMBER: 2014-21-07 PRODUCT: Certain Bombardier, Inc. Model CL-600-2C10 (Regional Jet Series 700, 701, & 702) airplanes, Model CL-600-2D24 (Regional Jet Series 900) airplanes>[...]

AD: Airbus Airplanes

AD NUMBER: 2014-21-10 PRODUCT: Certain Airbus Model A330-200 and -300 series airplanes, and Model A340-200 and -300 series airplanes.>[...]

ANN's Daily Aero-Linx (10.31.14)

Ex-MACs This group is made of retired McDonnell Engineers, most of whom began their careers at MAC either on the F101, F3H or F4H programs.>[...]

blog comments powered by Disqus



Advertisement

Advertisement

Podcasts

Advertisement

© 2007 - 2014 Web Development & Design by Pauli Systems, LC