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Sun, May 18, 2008

NTSB Prelim Notes Engine Problems Ahead Of Fatal C182 Accident

Control Issues Also Cited Following Entry Into Clouds, Snow

Editor's Note: Below is the unedited text of the National Transportation Safety Board's preliminary report, released this week, into the May 8 downing of a Cessna 182H near Black Hawk, CO that claimed the life of Barry Maggert, older brother of PGA Golfer Jeff Maggert.

Contrary to earlier reports that indicated weather was clear at the time of the accident, the sole survivor said the aircraft encountered instrument conditions over Eagle, CO, and subsequently began experiencing engine and control difficulties...

NTSB Identification: DFW08FA131
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, May 08, 2008 in Black Hawk, CO
Aircraft: Cessna 182H, registration: N8553S
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

On May 8, 2008 at approximately 1545 mountain daylight time, a single engine Cessna 182H, N8553S, impacted terrain and was destroyed following a partial loss of engine power near Black Hawk, Colorado. The private pilot was fatally injured and the passenger sustained serious injuries. The airplane was owned and operated by Winkmaggair LLC. Instrument meteorological conditions (IMC) were reported by the passenger and an instrument flight plan was filed for the 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. The cross country flight originated from Glenwood Springs Airport (GWS), Glenwood Springs, Colorado at approximately 1508 and was destined for Boulder Municipal Airport (BDU), Boulder, Colorado.

In a statement provided to the NTSB, the passenger reported that at 16,000 feet mean sea level (MSL), the airplane entered clouds with light snow after they passed Eagle County Airport (EGE). While en route to Boulder the airplane had difficultly maintaining altitude and the engine began to sputter. The passenger recalled that the pilot stated that they were experiencing a "mixture problem" and began adjusting the mixture control. The airplane began descending as the pilot attempted to troubleshoot the engine malfunction. The passenger stated that the airplane would "nose over" as the pilot attempted to control the airplane. The pilot continued to fly the airplane until they impacted a mountain at 10,400 feet MSL. The passenger egressed the airplane, freed the pilot, called for emergency services, and attempted to provide medical assistance to the pilot. The accident site was discovered by a local news helicopter and search and rescue (SAR) parties provided assistance.

The NTSB, Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), and technical representatives from Cessna aircraft, and Teledyne Continental Motors (TCM), examined the wreckage at the accident site. The wreckage was found in the upright position; several trees were damaged along the airplane's flight path into the terrain. All major components were accounted for at the accident site. Both wings and the horizontal stabilizer were crushed in multiple locations. Both fuel tank were breached, but fuel remained in both tanks. The fuselage was crushed on the pilot's side and the engine was partially buried into the snow and soil.

Upon recovery, the wreckage will be transported to a secure facility for further examination.

At 1545, an automated weather observation facility at Rocky Mountain Metropolitan Airport (BJC), located approximately 22.5 nautical miles east of the accident site, reported winds from 350 degrees at 5 knots, visibility 30 statute miles, scattered clouds at 6,000 feet, ceiling broken at 11,000 feet, temperature 59 degrees Fahrenheit, dew point 41 degrees Fahrenheit, barometric pressure of 29.78 inches of Mercury, and a remark that cumulonimbus clouds were present in all quadrants.

FMI: www.ntsb.gov


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