Vandenberg Launches Micro-Satellite | Aero-News Network
Aero-News Network
RSS icon RSS feed
podcast icon MP3 podcast
Subscribe Aero-News e-mail Newsletter Subscribe

Airborne Unlimited -- Recent Daily Episodes

Episode Date

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Airborne On ANN

Airborne 03.30.15

Airborne 03.24.15

Airborne 03.25.15

Airborne 03.26.15

Airborne 03.27.15

Airborne Hi-Def On YouTube

Airborne 03.30.15

Airborne 03.24.15

Airborne 03.25.15

Airborne 03.26.15

Airborne 03.27.15

 

Wed, Apr 13, 2005

Vandenberg Launches Micro-Satellite

Airmen of the 1st Air and Space Test Squadron launched XSS-11, a self-maneuvering, micro-satellite, into polar orbit, April 11.

An Orbital Suborbital Program Space Launch Vehicle carried the 220-pound satellite designed to further explore, demonstrate and flight-qualify micro-satellite technologies.

The launch vehicle for this mission, the Minotaur I, couples components of retired Minuteman II missiles with upper stage components from the commercial Pegasus rocket to create a low-cost launch vehicle with a 100-percent success rate. These vehicles are available only for government payloads.

“When you talk about the future of space, it’s right here, right now, on this mission,” said Lt. Col. Gary Henry, the squadron’s commander. “Both the launch vehicle and the spacecraft represent state-of-the-art responsive space systems. XSS-11 is only a harbinger of even greater things to come with very small, highly capable spacecraft. Couple this with a responsive, small space lift, and you have a very powerful capability.”

When the XSS-11 reaches orbit, it will rendezvous with a resident space object and perform extended proximity operations including standoff inspection and circumnavigation, which help Air Force Research Laboratory officials test the limits of today’s technology.

Another of the XSS-11 mission goals is to perform space-flight demonstration of technologies needed for NASA’s proposed plans to use spacecraft to collect samples of rocks and soil from Mars and return them to Earth for analysis.

“This is a very exciting mission,” said 1st Lt. Markyves Valentin, Minotaur test program manager. “There is a lot of work that goes into coordinating the many different agencies and players to make a launch happen, all for those few seconds of flight.” [ANN Salutes 1st Lt. Phillip Dobberfuhl, 30th Space Wing Public Affairs, for the story]

FMI: www.af.mil

Advertisement

More News

Airborne 03.30.15: Provisional TC-HondaJet, NASA/Mars, Lightspeed's Bluetooth

Also: New York Airways 1962, Mica Wants Privatized ATC, Ares UAV, Textron ProAdvantage, Boeing SC Union Vote, Whirly Girls The Honda Aircraft Company has announced that the HondaJe>[...]

Gone West: Lt. Col. Robert Hite

Had Been One Of The Doolittle Raiders Who Attacked Tokyo In 1942 One of the last of the 80 men to climb aboard 16 B-25 bombers and launch from an aircraft carrier in April 1942 to >[...]

ANN's Daily Aero-Linx (03.31.15)

Shawn Pederson - Road to Recovery Six months ago, Shawn "Norm" Pederson took the road less travelled. After retiring from a career of public service as United States Air Force pilo>[...]

ANN's Daily Aero-Term (03.31.15): Decision Height

With respect to the operation of aircraft, means the height at which a decision must be made during an ILS, MLS, or PAR instrument approach to either continue the approach or to ex>[...]

Aero-News: Quote Of The Day (03.31.15)

“NBAA is pleased that the FAA continues to recognize the importance of this tool to NBAA Member business aircraft owners seeking to maximize the efficiency and usability of a>[...]

blog comments powered by Disqus



Advertisement

Advertisement

Podcasts

Advertisement

© 2007 - 2015 Web Development & Design by Pauli Systems, LC