NTSB: Pilot Was 'Well Below The Glide Slope' In APA Crash | Aero-News Network
Aero-News Network
RSS icon RSS feed
podcast icon MP3 podcast
Subscribe Aero-News e-mail Newsletter Subscribe

** Airborne 04.18.14--CLICK HERE! ** HD iPad-Friendly Version--Airborne 04.18.14 **
** Airborne 04.16.14--CLICK HERE! ** HD iPad-Friendly Version--Airborne 04.16.14 **
** Airborne 04.14.14--CLICK HERE! ** HD iPad-Friendly Version--Airborne 04.14.14 **

Tue, Sep 13, 2005

NTSB: Pilot Was 'Well Below The Glide Slope' In APA Crash

Latest Accident Involving Controversial MU-2

While the exact cause(s) of last month's fatal downing of a Mitsubishi MU-2 on an ILS approach to Denver's Centennial Airport are not yet known, one aspect is hard to ignore: the plane was flying way too low.

So says the NTSB's preliminary findings on the August 4th accident, as reported by the Rocky Mountain News. The report states the tower controller told pilot Sam Hunter to "... check altitude... your altitude indicates six thousand four hundred... you appear to be well below the glide slope" as the MU-2 crossed a final approach fix approximately six n.m. from the field.

Hunter did not respond to repeated calls by the tower. The airplane impacted terrain 2.6 miles from the runway, according to the NTSB, killing the pilot. 
 
As was reported last month in Aero-News, the crash prompted Colorado Congressman Tom Toncrado to request an immediate grounding of all MU-2s, pending an FAA investigation into the fast turboprop twin's airworthiness. MU-2s are still flying while the FAA looks into the troubled safety record of the aircraft, the third such investigation since the early 80s. A search of the NTSB online database revealed 95 accidents or incidents involving Mitsubishi MU-2s since 1983, including several fatalities.

Mitsubishi maintains that the aircraft is safe, although the company also acknowledges it requires highly-specialized training to operate safely.

FMI: Search MU-2 Accident History

Advertisement

More News

Aero-News: Quote Of The Day (04.20.14)

"The discovery of Kepler-186f is a significant step toward finding worlds like our planet Earth. Future NASA missions, like the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite and the James >[...]

Skydive Jersey Announces Shuttle Service For 2014 Season

Removes 'Getting To The Airport' As An Excuse To Not Go Skydiving So imagine it's a beautiful day to go jump out of an airplane in the greater New York City area, but you just don'>[...]

ANN's Daily Aero-Term (04.20.14): Ground Stop

Ground Stop Ground Stops are implemented for a number of reasons. The most common reasons are: 1) To control air traffic volume to airports when the projected traffic demand is exp>[...]

ANN's Daily Aero-Linx (04.20.14)

Aero Linx: The Australian Parachute Federation The Australian Parachute Federation exists to administer and represent Australian Sport Parachuting. This is achieved by promoting an>[...]

ANN FAQ: Getting The Most Out Of ANN's Newsletters

ANN goes through a lot of trouble to make the graphics flashy and cool and an integral part of the story. But let's face it, they're bandwidth-intensive. So here are a couple of th>[...]

blog comments powered by Disqus



Advertisement

Advertisement

Podcasts

Advertisement

© 2007 - 2014 Web Development & Design by Pauli Systems, LC