GA Airport Security: NATA Chimes In | Aero-News Network
Aero-News Network
RSS icon RSS feed
podcast icon MP3 podcast
Subscribe Aero-News e-mail Newsletter Subscribe

Airborne Unlimited -- Recent Daily Episodes

Episode Date

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Airborne On ANN

Airborne 02.23.15

Airborne 02.24.15

Airborne 02.25.15

Airborne 02.26.15

Airborne 02.27.15

Airborne Hi-Def On YouTube

Airborne 02.23.15

Airborne 02.24.15

Airborne 02.25.15

Airborne 02.26.15

Airborne 02.27.15

Thu, May 20, 2004

GA Airport Security: NATA Chimes In

Says It's "Pleased" At TSA Guidelines

The TSA, after months of preparation, released its General Aviation Security Recommendations to the public earlier this week. Sent out as a TSA Information Publication (IP), the guidelines are suggested security procedures for general aviation airports and are not meant to be considered mandatory.

The guidelines are a result of months of work by the Aviation Security Advisory Committee (ASAC) General Aviation Working Group and the TSA. The ASAC developed a list of recommendations based on best practices of the general aviation community. The TSA incorporated each of those recommendations into the final guidance document, with greater overall detail provided to eliminate ambiguity.

"Overall, NATA is pleased with the guidance document and is appreciative of the fact that the TSA took our recommendations into consideration while drafting the IP," stated NATA president James K. Coyne. "The document will be a great asset for those looking to improve upon their already sufficient security plans."

The framework of the IP is seven functional areas – personnel, aircraft, airports/facilities, surveillance, security plans and communications and specialty operations. The IP also provides a method for airports to determine their security needs, realizing that there is no "one size fits all" approach when it comes to airport security.

The TSA considers the IP a "living document" that will be updated and modified as new security enhancements are developed and as they receive additional input from the aviation industry.

One of the concerns raised with the issuing of this IP is how the states will react. Early indications from some states are that these recommendations could be codified into state law.

"Our only concern with the IP is that states may interpret this document as regulatory framework and make the recommendations mandatory," Coyne continued. "That is not the use for which the TSA or the ASAC intended the document and the TSA and industry must ensure that the states recognize this."

FMI: www.nata.aero

Advertisement

More News

ANN Is Hiring! Videographers Needed For Airborne Unlimited Program Staff

Videographer/Reporters Needed For Airborne Unlimited Program Expansion Aero-News and Airborne are expanding--and innovating! And we're seeking additional on-air video journalist(s)>[...]

Airborne 02.26.15: NBAA v Santa Monica, F22 Airshow Sked, Google Lunar XPrize

Also: Pioneering Space, IMC Clubs, BizJet Forecast, R44 SAIB, Twin Otter Upgrade, Cecil Field's Naval Influx The saga of Santa Monica Airport in California continues as the NBAA ha>[...]

ANN's Daily Aero-Linx (02.27.15)

National Association of Rocketry The NAR is all about having fun and learning more with and about sport rockets.>[...]

ANN's Daily Aero-Term (02.27.15): Propeller/Rotor Modulation Error

Certain propeller RPM settings or helicopter rotor speeds can cause the VOR course deviation indicator (CDI) to fluctuate.>[...]

Aero-News: Quote Of The Day (02.27.15)

“With this new layer of liability protection, landowners are more likely to grant permission for the use of these airstrips." Source: Recreational Aviation Foundation (RAF) m>[...]

blog comments powered by Disqus



Advertisement

Advertisement

Podcasts

Advertisement

© 2007 - 2015 Web Development & Design by Pauli Systems, LC