NASA Study Links Severe Storm Increases To Global Warming | Aero-News Network
Aero-News Network
RSS icon RSS feed
podcast icon MP3 podcast
Subscribe Aero-News e-mail Newsletter Subscribe

** Airborne 10.01.14 ** HD iPad-Friendly -- Airborne 10.01.14 **
** Airborne 09.29.14 ** HD iPad-Friendly -- Airborne 09.29.14 **
** Airborne 09.26.14 ** HD iPad-Friendly -- Airborne 09.26.14 **

Tue, Dec 23, 2008

NASA Study Links Severe Storm Increases To Global Warming

Study's Findings Consistent With Earlier Report, Says Scientists

The frequency of extremely high clouds in Earth's tropics -- the type associated with severe storms and rainfall -- is increasing as a result of global warming, according to a study by scientists at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA.

In a presentation Friday to the fall meeting of the American Geophysical Union in San Francisco, JPL Senior Research Scientist Hartmut Aumann outlined the results of a study based on five years of data from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument on NASA's Aqua spacecraft.

The AIRS data were used to observe certain types of tropical clouds linked with severe storms, torrential rain and hail. The instrument typically detects about 6,000 of these clouds each day. Aumann and his team found a strong correlation between the frequency of these clouds and seasonal variations in the average sea surface temperature of the tropical oceans.

For every degree Centigrade (1.8 degrees Fahrenheit) increase in average ocean surface temperature, the team observed a 45-percent increase in the frequency of the very high clouds. At the present rate of global warming of 0.13 degrees Celsius (0.23 degrees Fahrenheit) per decade, the team inferred the frequency of these storms can be expected to increase by six percent per decade.

Climate modelers have long speculated that the frequency and intensity of severe storms may or may not increase with global warming. Aumann said results of the study will help improve their models.

"Clouds and rain have been the weakest link in climate prediction," said Aumann. "The interaction between the daytime warming of the sea surface under clear-sky conditions and increases in the formation of low clouds, high clouds and, ultimately, rain is very complicated. The high clouds in our observations—typically at altitudes of 20 kilometers (12 miles) and higher—present the greatest difficulties for current climate models, which aren't able to resolve cloud structures smaller than about 250 kilometers (155 miles) in size."

Aumann said the results of his study, published recently in Geophysical Research Letters, are consistent with another NASA-funded study by Frank Wentz and colleagues in 2005. That study found an increase in the global rain rate of 1.5 percent per decade over 18 years, a value that is about five times higher than the value estimated by climate models that were used in the 2007 report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

FMI: http://airs.jpl.nasa.gov/

Advertisement

More News

Airborne 10.01.14: Sierra Nevada v NASA, A-29 Goes To Work, Be-200 Rebirth?

Also: PPC Bird's Eye View, Spitfires Return?, Cessna Sued Over 1981 Accident, Santa Monica Sues Pilot's Estate, Phase 1 Flight Testing Update Sierra Nevada Corporation (SNC) has fi>[...]

ANN's Daily Aero-Linx (10.02.14)

This site is intended to be a meeting place for those who rescue, shelter or foster animals, and volunteer pilots and plane owners willing to assist with the transportation of anim>[...]

ANN's Daily Aero-Term (10.02.14): Forward Flank Downdraft

The main region of downdraft in the forward, or leading, part of a supercell, where most of the heavy precipitation is located.>[...]

Aero-News: Quote Of The Day (10.02.14)

“I have something to tell you. But from now on you have to be really nice to me.” Source: Marsha Fulton of Covington, IN.>[...]

ANN FAQ: You Can Sponsor ANN And/Or Aero-TV!

Help ANN Grow So That We Can Be Of Greater Service To You! For the better part of a dozen years, ANN has set the pace for the growing and evolving aero-info revolution. No other ne>[...]

blog comments powered by Disqus



Advertisement

Advertisement

Podcasts

Advertisement

© 2007 - 2014 Web Development & Design by Pauli Systems, LC