Thirteen Bodies Recovered from Peruvian Airplane Crash | Aero-News Network
Aero-News Network
RSS icon RSS feed
podcast icon MP3 podcast
Subscribe Aero-News e-mail Newsletter Subscribe

** Airborne 04.21.14--CLICK HERE! ** HD iPad-Friendly Version--Airborne 04.21.14 **
** Airborne 04.18.14--CLICK HERE! ** HD iPad-Friendly Version--Airborne 04.18.14 **
** Airborne 04.16.14--CLICK HERE! ** HD iPad-Friendly Version--Airborne 04.16.14 **

Mon, May 28, 2007

Thirteen Bodies Recovered from Peruvian Airplane Crash

Disagreement As To Number of Survivors In Thursday's Accident

Peruvian police recovered the remains of 13 people killed in a plane crash Thursday, including the three-man crew, in the country's northeastern jungle, a regional official said.

The Defense Ministry said 20 people were traveling aboard the De Havilland plane, but there were conflicting reports from police and the ministry about the number of survivors, reported the Associated Press.

Police said there are seven survivors, while the ministry originally said eight. Defense Ministry officials were not immediately available for comment Sunday.

The Defence Ministry had not yet released the passenger list or an official report of the crash.

The government flight was part of the air force's civic action flights, which connect small communities in the jungle not served by commercial airliners, as originally reported by ANN.

The Twin Otter crashed in Peru's northeastern jungle in a rainstorm, plowing into dense jungle an hour after takeoff.

Norman Lewis del Alcazar, vice president of the Loreto region, said it was raining heavily when the flight left from Orellana. The plane originated in Iquitos, the capital of Loreto.

The plane apparently was caught in a strong wind when it crashed 350 miles northeast of Lima, said Juan Montes, a police spokesman in the jungle village Contamana, the flight's next scheduled stop.

State news agency Andina reported that strong winds knocked down trees and ripped the roofs off some homes in the area that day.

Ivan Vasquez, president of the Loreto region, where the government-operated flight originated, told Lima radio station Radioprogramas that rough terrain made recovering the bodies "rather difficult." Officials found the twin-engine Twin Otter aircraft in a low, jungle-covered mountain range.

FMI: www.andina.com.pe, www.peru.gob.pe, www.fap.mil.pe

Advertisement

More News

Classic Aero-TV: Aero-Statesman Phil Boyer – Representing The Aviation Community

Retired AOPA President Still Understands What An Association Must Do To Serve An Embattled Industry Originally WebCast October 18, 2012: Its been nearly four years since Phil Boyer>[...]

AD: Ballonbau Wörner GmbH Balloons

AD NUMBER: 2014-07-10 PRODUCT: Ballonbau Wörner GmbH Models NL-280/STU, NL-380/STU, NL-510/STU, NL-640/STU, NL-840/STU, and NL-1000/STU balloons.>[...]

Airshow Pilot Bails Out After Catastrophic Aircraft Failure

Planning Ahead And Staying Safe Saves A Professional Airshow Pilot Dan Marcotte describes himself on his website as being determined and driven with a sense of vision. His adventur>[...]

ANN FAQ: Share Aero-News With Your Friends

Send Them A Story -- We Don't Mind! Do you need another set of eyes to see that story you can't believe Jim just wrote? Want to spread Hognose's unique wisdom and perspective to th>[...]

AD: Centrair Gliders

AD NUMBER: 2014-07-08 PRODUCT: Centrair Model 101, 101A, 101AP, and 101P gliders.>[...]

blog comments powered by Disqus



Advertisement

Advertisement

Podcasts

Advertisement

© 2007 - 2014 Web Development & Design by Pauli Systems, LC