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Wed, Apr 02, 2003

Lycoming Completes SB 552 Crankshaft Replacement Program

Lycoming has successfully completed the installation of replacement crankshafts in the 797 TIO-540 engines that were returned for repair under Service Bulletin 552 and has shipped these engines so they can be returned to service. Of the 601 engines tested under Service Bulletin 553, 417 have passed and most of the remaining 184 have been repaired and returned to service.

More than 1,100 crankshafts have been forged using a new, more vigorous manufacturing process and have passed newly developed tests.

"We made a promise to our customers that we would resolve this replacement and repair issue by the early part of the second quarter and we have delivered on that promise," said Richard Millman, executive in charge of Lycoming.

In the fall of 2002, Lycoming committed to replacing crankshafts in engines covered by Service Bulletins 552 and 553. Owners and operators of aircraft powered by Lycoming TIO-540 engines of more than 300 or more horsepower were required to comply with the service bulletins and to replace their crankshafts. The cost of the crankshaft replacement, as well as various related costs, were paid by Lycoming as part of its Customer Care Program. In addition to repairing and replacing internal parts, the Program includes alternate transportation or fixed costs (including interest on loans, insurance {ground insurance} and hangar rental); remote hangar fees; and an additional 12 month engine warranty from the date the engine is returned to service. More than $35 million was earmarked to cover the costs of the repair and customer care program.

"The repair process included the thorough disassembly, inspection, crankshaft replacement, assembly and full testing consistent with our commitment to flight safety," said Mike Wolf, president of Lycoming. "I am happy to report that we have met our goals ahead of schedule and sent these engines back to their owners."

FMI: www.lycoming.textron.com

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