Covering An Airplane With Fabric Is A Skill You Can Learn At Oshkosh | Aero-News Network
Aero-News Network
RSS icon RSS feed
podcast icon MP3 podcast
Subscribe Aero-News e-mail Newsletter Subscribe

Airborne Unlimited -- Recent Daily Episodes

Episode Date






Airborne On ANN

Airborne 10.17.16

Airborne 10.18.16

Airborne 10.19.16

Airborne 10.20.16

Airborne 10.21.16

Airborne Hi-Def On YouTube

Airborne 10.17.16

Airborne 10.18.16

Airborne 10.19.16

Airborne 10.20.16

Airborne 10.21.16

Fri, Jul 27, 2012

Covering An Airplane With Fabric Is A Skill You Can Learn At Oshkosh

It's One Of The Early Steps Of Building An Airplane

By Maria Morrison

Now, anyone can learn how to ribstitch, cover, or poly-brush an airplane with the help of a group of people in a tent by the hangars. Here about 10 people teach about the various stages of building and aircraft when it is just a couple pieces of wood.

First, you have to do covering. This is where the wooden frame gets covered with fabric. Fabric is glued down and then smothered with acetone. this helps it stay forever. Once the fabric is all glued down, the people use a common household iron to shrink down the fabric and take out wrinkles. When the fabric is done, it can be shrunk by 12 percent.

The next step is the poly-brushing. Poly-brush is a pink liquid that fills the weave in the fabric. While the poly-brush is still wet, they put on the finishing tapes, which are long strips of fabric over the ribs.

After the poly-brushing is dry, people put chalk lines on the piece for ribstitches. The space between the lines depends on the type of aircraft, but they are normally 1-2 inches away from each other. Then, thin tapes are laid down in the middle of the finishing tapes, directly over the ribs. Holes for the stitches are pokes next to the tapes on the chalk lines.

Last is ribstitching. This is where the stitcher takes a long needle and a waxy string and threads it through the holes, tying special knots along the way. Stitching is required over the ribs to stop the fabric from bubbling up during flight, but it is also good to have anywhere that is out in the wind.

The booth had a Corben Baby Ace structure on display, along with many covered pieces of a J-1 and a Tripacer.



More News

Airborne 10.21.16: NIMBYs Out Of Control, SMO Evictions On Hold, New Race Class

Also: CVR/FDR Expansion, Focusing On Santa Monica, NASAO Boss, GE9X Engine, 1000th H-60M, Verizon Drones, New LAS ATC A Transportation Safety Board of Canada team is currently inve>[...]

Aero-News: Quote of the Day (10.23.16)

Aero-News Quote of the Day "Think of this transition as changing an engine on a plane when it's inflight. Rolling out STARS in our nation's busiest airspaces, without disrupting ai>[...]

ANN's Daily Aero-Linx (10.23.16)

Aero Linx: The Society of United States Air Force Flight Surgeons (SoUSAFFS) SoUSAFFS was established in 1960 to more specifically support the USAF FS than AsMA at large could. Sin>[...]

ANN's Daily Aero-Term (10.23.16): Final Approach Point

Final Approach Point The point, applicable only to a nonprecision approach with no depicted FAF (such as an on airport VOR), where the aircraft is established inbound on the final >[...]

ANN FAQ: Q&A 101

A Few Questions AND Answers To Help You Get MORE Out of ANN!>[...]

blog comments powered by Disqus





© 2007 - 2016 Web Development & Design by Pauli Systems, LC