Navy Hero Takes Over Command Of Aussie Troops In Iraq | Aero-News Network
Aero-News Network
RSS icon RSS feed
podcast icon MP3 podcast
Subscribe Aero-News e-mail Newsletter Subscribe

Airborne Unlimited -- Recent Daily Episodes

Episode Date

Airborne Unlimited-
Monday

Airborne-Unmanned w/AUVSI-
Tuesday

Airborne Unlimited-
Wednesday

AMA Drone Report-
Thursday

Airborne Unlimited-
Friday

Airborne On ANN

Airborne 04.16.18

Airborne-UnManned 04.17.18

Airborne 04.18.18

AMA Drone Report 04.19.18

Airborne 04.20.18

Airborne-YouTube

Airborne 04.16.18

Airborne-UnManned 04.17.18

Airborne 04.18.18

AMA Drone Report 04.19.18

Airborne 04.20.18

Mon, May 23, 2005

Navy Hero Takes Over Command Of Aussie Troops In Iraq

Commodore Geoff Ledger Credited With Navy's Most Daring Rescue Ever

The 1370 Australian service members serving in Iraq have a new commander in Navy Commodore Geoff Ledger -- a veteran helicopter pilot who says his top priority will be saving lives and protecting soldiers. He already has a lot of practice in that area.

Ledger, 61, is credited with commanding the most daring, difficult aerial rescue in Australian naval history. It began while he was on a training mission in Singapore 22-years ago.

The then-lieutenant was called into action in the strait between Singapore and Sentosa Island, after a passing ship fouled a cable car line. More than a dozen people were stranded in the swaying cars, which themselves were in danger of falling more than 200-feet into the ocean below.

"The rescue was like a Spider-Man trick. It was the most hazardous rescue operation I had ever performed," Ledger told Australian reporters. The victims were exhausted and terrified.  "They had been inside the car for almost 10 hours. It was dark and the wind was 10 to 15 knots and the downwash from the rotor blades made the winchman and cable car swing wildly."

Eventually, the two cable cars indeed fell into the sea, but in the nine hours between his arrival and the cable's collapse, Ledger was able to rescue seven people. He was decorated by a most grateful Singapore government.

Now the job is a lot different and, in some ways, even more intimidating. "I was in control of the helicopter in that rescue. I am not actually in control of what happens around me here. It is like sitting in the back of the aircraft and you hope to God the pilot is going to fly the plane the way you want to go."

FMI: www.navy.gov.au

Advertisement

More News

Airborne-Unmanned 04.17.18: XPO 2018, Drone Broadcasts, Airbus Inspection Drone

Also: NZ AFB Drone Incident, Police UAVs, Inaugural Drone Boot Camp, Predator 5M Flight Hours This is it! THE major unmanned exposition of the year -- AUVSI XPONENTIAL 2018 starts >[...]

Airborne 04.20.18: Continental Jet-A Seminole, SWA Fallout, NYC NIMBY's Helo's

Also: Teamsters Talk Allegiant, Coleman Young Airport, Miracle Flights, IN Av Repair Biz Cleared Piper has selected the Continental Motors CD-170 compression ignition engine fueled>[...]

AMA Drone Report 04.19.18: AMA Leadership, FAA Reauthorization, Coachella

Also: New French Regs, Drone Boot Camp, Public Safety Drone Standards, DroneShield Protects NASCAR It’s a little bit sad and yet a bit cool to see AMA make an exciting change>[...]

Aero-News: Quote of the Day (04.22.18)

"For those reasons, a key measure of success is not, 'Did we provide the most flights possible?' but 'Did we provide the most comfortable flights possible?'—for instance, by >[...]

ANN's Daily Aero-Linx (04.22.18)

Aero Linx: The Airline Pilot's Historical Society The Airline Pilot's Historical Society is a non-profit, charitable foundation whose purpose is to educate through the preservation>[...]

blog comments powered by Disqus



Advertisement

Advertisement

Podcasts

Advertisement

© 2007 - 2018 Web Development & Design by Pauli Systems, LC