FAA Suspends Opposite Direction Operations At Commercial Airports | Aero-News Network
Aero-News Network
RSS icon RSS feed
podcast icon MP3 podcast
Subscribe Aero-News e-mail Newsletter Subscribe

Airborne Unlimited -- Recent Daily Episodes

Episode Date

AMA Drone Report

Airborne-Monday

Airborne-Tuesday

Airborne-Wednesday

Airborne-Thursday

Airborne-Friday

Airborne On ANN

ADR 02.20.17

Airborne 02.27.17

Airborne 02.28.17

Airborne 02.22.17

Airborne 02.23.17

Airborne 02.24.17

Airborne-HD On YouTube

ADR 02.20.17

Airborne 02.27.17

Airborne 02.28.17

Airborne 02.22.17

Airborne 02.23.17

Airborne 02.24.17

Wed, Aug 08, 2012

FAA Suspends Opposite Direction Operations At Commercial Airports

Move The Result Of Near-Collision Near Washington, DC

The near-collision which happened when airplanes departing from and landing at KDCA in Washington, DC last week were inadevertently placed on a collision course has prompted the FAA to temporarily suspend opposite direction operations at commercial airports pending the development of new procedures. The announcement came in a memo to Acting Administrator Michael Huerta (pictured) sent Tuesday by Chief Operating Officer David Grizzle.

In the memo, Grizzle said that there is no standard protocol in place specifically for opposite direction operations, which it is believed contributed to the miscommunication between TRACON and the Tower at DCA.

"We expect to have these detailed procedures in place across the system within a month, and sooner than that at locations that have frequent demand for opposite direction operations," Grizzle said in the memo. "In the interim, we will only use this type of operation in an emergency situation. While we are training on these new procedures, we will also reinforce the necessity for diligently following existing protocols when we turn the direction of an airport."

Grizzle said the FAA is working with NATCA to determine what kind of training will be needed to facilitate the new procedures. He said the incident also raised the issue that "front line managers (FLM) are not only overseeing operations in the tower, but also managing administrative tasks. During times of moderate to heavy and/or complex traffic, we need to be sure that they are solely focused on the operations in the facility, and not the handling of administrative duties at that time."

The FAA is coordinating with the NTSB in an investigation of the incident.

FMI: www.faa.gov

Advertisement

More News

Counting Down! ANN's Infamous April 1st Edition's Just Around The Corner!

Get Your Wacky Ideas In NOW! ANN E-I-C Note: Folks... we gotta warn you... our Annual April 1st Editions are LEGENDARY -- and this WILL be our best April 1st Edition yet. Based on >[...]

Airborne 02.24.17: RV-10 Suit Dismissed, 2016 GA Sales, Red Tail Legacy

Also: Falcon 9 Landing, TFR Busts, Denton Airshow, QF-16, Treasure Coast, 'Fly Safe' Campaign, Juno Mission When the news first came out, in 2015, that Van's Aircraft was sued for >[...]

Sun 'N Fun To Host Massive Gathering Of P-51 Mustangs

Expected To Be The Largest Assembly Of P-51s In A Decade Or More It is being billed as possibly the largest gathering of P-51 Mustangs in a decade or more ... on Wednesday, April 5>[...]

DJI Hints At A New Drone, Reveals Details Early

Industry WAS Speculating What The Drone Giant May Be Bringing To Market Next Generating buzz is good marketing, and DJI was doing so with a Tweet announcing new products for the Mo>[...]

Klyde Morris (02.27.17)

Klyde Is Amazed By All The Ways NASA Info Gets Interpreted FMI: www.klydemorris.com>[...]

blog comments powered by Disqus



Advertisement

Advertisement

Podcasts

Advertisement

© 2007 - 2017 Web Development & Design by Pauli Systems, LC