The Newsman's Paradox: No Time To Read The Paper | Aero-News Network
Aero-News Network
RSS icon RSS feed
podcast icon MP3 podcast
Subscribe Aero-News e-mail Newsletter Subscribe

Airborne Unlimited -- Recent Daily Episodes

Episode Date

Airborne Unlimited-
Monday

Airborne-Unmanned w/AUVSI-
Tuesday

Airborne Unlimited-
Wednesday

AMA Drone Report-
Thursday

Airborne Unlimited-
Friday

Airborne On ANN

Airborne 05.21.18

Airborne-UnManned 05.22.18

Airborne 05.23.18

AMA Drone Report 05.24.18

Airborne 05.18.18

Airborne-YouTube

Airborne 05.21.18

Airborne-UnManned 05.22.18

Airborne 05.23.18

AMA Drone Report 05.24.18

Airborne 05.18.18

Fri, Jul 28, 2006

The Newsman's Paradox: No Time To Read The Paper

I Know Less Than You Do Right Now

Aero-Views OPINION by Kevin R.C. "Hognose" O'Brien

If you want to find out about the overall theme of what's happening at Oshkosh this year, especially in the first few days of the show, you're a lot better off asking an Aero-News reader than an Aero-News writer or even editor right now.

Why is that? Because this week kicks off with us being deluged with a firehose of input. We have to read, record, review, listen, triage, sort and revise, according to our experience and news judgment, all this stuff, and then try to provide you with a news product that's informative and entertaining.

The first few days are especially hectic as exhibitors scramble for the best press conference slots and hit us with several new products, new deals, or new angles a day. In addition to the press conferences with substantial news, there are others where there's really nothing new... but the exhibitor is trying to spin us as if there is.

Then there's other news in the rest of the world, including the every-year sad tale of somebody, or several somebodies, crashing enroute to the event. Businesses are still making deals, and even some that are naturals for this market are tied up deal-making somewhere else.

Governments, commercial and military aerospace, and the airline sector take no notice of Airventure and continue their routine activity. There's still a war on; a couple or three of them, actually. All that generates news.

No one can write it all, so we divide it up. Sometimes you can follow your interests, sometimes you have to accept an assignment on something you don't like, or worse, don't understand well. By the time he or she is done with that report, the reporter is, if nothing else, better educated on the matter than before.

You might not care about every sort of news we report. According to our research, many readers don't, and they often don't understand why anyone would bother with some of the other stuff. But we've also learned that everybody's got a different view of what's "news," what's "important," and what's the "other stuff" that can be gotten rid of.

Believe me, we'd love to trim our workload and cover fewer things in more depth. The trouble is, every sort of story and feature we do has a constituency. I once thought it was wasteful for us to cover Airworthiness Directives -- after all, if you maintain planes, you subscribe to this information yourself already. To my personal surprise, I found that numerous readers, including many who have access to more official AD reports, value this information.

We have people who are generalists and people who are in-depth experts on almost every facet of aviation. Most of us are here because we love the industry, or sport as the case may be. But the nature of the news business means that we won't have time for anything more than the narrow, blinkered view of the stories we're personally covering, which usually but not always are in our field of expertise. We don't even have time to read our own site to see what our colleagues have done (we usually catch up after the show).

So, the paradox is that you the reader may know more about what's going on in Oshkosh today than I do. As long as a story takes longer to write and report than it does to read, that'll probably always be the case, although we're always looking for a way for technology to streamline our work (The Automatronic WriterBot 7000 shows some promise... but it only wants to cover warbirds -- Ed.)

Despite the paradox, I'll be heading out today to try to cover stories that will, one hopes, be informative and interesting to both of us. And at the end of the day, if you read the whole site, I'll still know less than you do.

FMI: www.aero-news.net

Advertisement

More News

Airborne 05.21.18: Bally Bomber At OSH18!, Belite Chipper, CH-53 Deliveries

Also: NATS-Aireon, H135 For US Navy, EmPower STC, Spidertracks-Olympic Aero Services Oshkosh 2018 is ramping up to be an outstanding addition to an aviator’s MUST-SEE list...>[...]

Airborne-Unmanned 05.22.18: Aurora ACUS, Horsefly Delivers, K2 LEO UAS

Also: Aero-TV: Textron's X5-55, InfraDrone App, NASA's Mars Helicopter, Gremlins on Track This month, Aurora’s Autonomous Aerial Cargo Utility System (AACUS) successfully del>[...]

AMA Drone Report 05.17.18: AMA Expo West Upgrades, UAS IPP, Amazon Snubbed

Also: Drones v Flaming Kites, Sherrif Drones, ALPA Is Watching..., Wichita Aviation Pathway After a number of years in Ontario, California; the highly anticipated 2018 rendition of>[...]

ANNouncement: Now Accepting Applications For Oshkosh 2018 Stringers!!!

An Amazing Experience Awaits The Chosen Few... E-I-C Note: There's very little we can say yet, but there is a reason why this may be THE year to throw in with ANN to cover the extr>[...]

It's On--Again! EAA/ANN Announce 2018 AirVenture Innovation Preview!

Stunningly Successful Innovation Program Draws Hundreds of Thousands of Eyeballs to ‘All Things AirVenture’ E-I-C Note: We're tremendously excited to work with EAA agai>[...]

blog comments powered by Disqus



Advertisement

Advertisement

Podcasts

Advertisement

© 2007 - 2018 Web Development & Design by Pauli Systems, LC