Texas College Researchers Hijack Drone On A 'Dare' | Aero-News Network
Aero-News Network
RSS icon RSS feed
podcast icon MP3 podcast
Subscribe Aero-News e-mail Newsletter Subscribe

Airborne Unlimited -- Recent Daily Episodes

Episode Date

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Airborne On ANN

Airborne 08.22.16

Airborne 08.23.16

Airborne 08.24.16

Airborne 08.25.16

Airborne 08.19.16

Airborne Hi-Def On YouTube

Airborne 08.22.16

Airborne 08.23.16

Airborne 08.24.16

Airborne 08.25.16

Airborne 08.19.16

Tweet Us The Coolest Things You See @OSH16!
#OSH16Coolest!

It's Alive!: AirVenture 2016 Innovation Preview on Vimeo!

It's Alive!: AirVenture 2016 Innovation Preview on YouTube!

Fri, Jun 29, 2012

Texas College Researchers Hijack Drone On A 'Dare'

Reportedly 'Spoofed' A UAV With A $1,000 Device

Sometimes, the words "don't dare me" carry some pretty significant meaning.

Take the example of researchers at the Austin Radionavigation Lab at the University of Texas, who were in essence "dared" to try to hack a supposedly hackproof drone by the Department of Homeland Security.

A variety of media sources, including MSC Now, Fox News, and the Russian news service RT are reporting that the researchers did just that; repeatedly taking control of a UAV in a controlled test using a piece of equipment worth about $1,000.

Professor Todd Humphrey of UT's Radionavigation Lab managed to scramble the flight plan of a small drone flying over Austin stadium. It was reportedly following its pre-programmed flight plan perfectly, until it wasn't. The drone dove towards the ground, but a crash was avoided when the team altered the course a few feet above the ground.

Humphrey told Fox News that the process is called "spoofing," and it's not very difficult for someone with the right equipment.

Spoofing involves jamming the UAV's GPS signals, but recent developments allow the spoofer to actually take over the drone and re-direct it. Humphrey said his spoofing device, which is the most advanced available, is at that $1,000 price point. It works by overpowering the weak signals coming from satellites with stronger ones emitted from the device.

The professor said finding a way to beat the spoofing devices is akin to reinforcing and locking the cockpit doors of commercial airliners. "We have to adopt that mentality as far as the navigation systems for the UAVs," he said.

(Predator UAV file photo)

FMI: www.dhs.gov

Advertisement

More News

Oshkosh 2016: The Highs, The Lows, The Heroes and The Bozos…

A Look Back At The Aero-Equivalent Of Burning Man, Woodstock, And An Old Fashioned Tent Revival—All Rolled Into One Week in Wisconsin With Oshkosh all of a few weeks in the r>[...]

Airborne 08.24.16: Northrop Grumman T-X, Refurbished F-14A, Helo Cash Drop

Also: Mini-Drone, Avilution, Narita Tower, US/Mexico Av-Agreement, UK Helipads Too Small, FAA Employee Busted, Proba-3 If it was a secret, it isn’t now, as a few images of No>[...]

Airborne 08.23.16: Santa Monica Fights On, ISS Readies, ICAO Flight Plans

Also: ANN Is Hiring!, Aero-Calendar, UAV v Helo, AIA Briefs Clinton, First LM-100J, Teamsters, Smalltrack A resolution has been considered by the Santa Monica City Council would ma>[...]

Airborne 08.24.16: Northrop Grumman T-X, Refurbished F-14A, Helo Cash Drop

Also: Mini-Drone, Avilution, Narita Tower, US/Mexico Av-Agreement, UK Helipads Too Small, FAA Employee Busted, Proba-3 If it was a secret, it isn’t now, as a few images of No>[...]

AD: Rolls-Royce Deutschland Ltd & Co KG Turbofan Engines

AD NUMBER: 2016-17-01 PRODUCT: All Rolls-Royce Deutschland Ltd & Co KG (RRD) Tay 650-15 and Tay 651-54 turbofan engines.>[...]

blog comments powered by Disqus



Advertisement

Advertisement

Podcasts

Advertisement

© 2007 - 2016 Web Development & Design by Pauli Systems, LC