American Cuts 767-300 Capacity Due To Lack Of Rafts | Aero-News Network
Aero-News Network
RSS icon RSS feed
podcast icon MP3 podcast
Subscribe Aero-News e-mail Newsletter Subscribe

Airborne Unlimited -- Recent Daily Episodes

Episode Date

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Airborne On ANN

Airborne 07.20.15

Airborne 07.21.15

Airborne 07.22.15

Airborne 07.23.15

Airborne 07.24.15

Airborne Hi-Def On YouTube

Airborne 07.20.15

Airborne 07.21.15

Airborne 07.22.15

Airborne 07.23.15

Airborne 07.24.15

EAA/ANN AirVenture Innovation Preview

AIP-#1 Vimeo

AIP-#2 Vimeo

AIP-Part 1 YouTube

AIP-Part 2 YouTube

Thu, Jan 29, 2009

American Cuts 767-300 Capacity Due To Lack Of Rafts

Audit Determined Seat Change Took Planes Out Of Regs

The next time you're onboard an American Airlines trans-Atlantic flight, you may notice fewer people onboard. The Fort Worth, TX-based airline will limit the number of passengers allowed to fly onboard its Boeing 767-300s, after the carrier found the planes did not have the required number of life rafts onboard.

American spokesman Tim Wagner told The Associated Press the problem stems from American's recently-redesigned business-class cabins on the widebody planes, which expanded the number of available seats.

Some planes have been flying since 2005 without a suitable number of rafts onboard. Wagner said the problem came to light when the airline reviewed life raft capacity on its recently-added Boeing 737-800s -- spurred by the recent ditching of a US Airways A320 -- and opted to conduct similar reviews throughout the fleet.

FAA regulations require enough life rafts to accommodate a full cabin of passengers, including children seated on parents' laps, even of one life raft fails to inflate.

American's 767-300s can hold 236 people, including 11 crewmembers. Until more rafts are added -- American expects the process to take about a month, including crewmember training -- the carrier will limit passenger capacity to no more than 228 people on 767-300 flights to Europe and Latin America.

The airline stressed passengers were not endangered by the oversight, as there are other flotation devices available for passengers to use in the event of a water landing.

Wagner was not aware of any affected flights that are booked to capacity. "Given the time of year and what's going on in the economy, I'm not aware of any flights where we're going to have to bump someone," he said.

American has 58 767-300s in its fleet. All other types passed the test, Wagner said.

FMI: www.aa.com

Advertisement

More News

Airborne At OSH15 Day 5 Redux: Inhofe's Mission, NextGen GA Fund, New Kitfox

Also: Cicare 8, Switchblade Update, Beringer Alaskan Bush Gear, Jack Pelton Interview - Final E-I-C Note: Regularly Daily Airborne Unlimited Programming will resume this Monday now>[...]

Aero-News: Quote Of The Day (08.02.15)

"This is a prime example of where the synergies from the Orbital ATK merger are providing real benefits to our customers, by being able to deploy one launch team that possesses exp>[...]

Transaero Airlines Receives Its First A321

Airliner On Lease From ICBC Leasing Of China Transaero Airlines has taken delivery of its first Airbus A321 as a result of a long-term leasing agreement between the airline and ICB>[...]

October Conference Will Focus On Rotorcraft Certification Standards

Safety, ADS-B, HTAWS, Flight Data Monitoring All On The Agenda The first Rotorcraft Certification Summit is being planned for October 27th in Dallas, with organizers are expecting >[...]

Raytheon, Partners Develop Low-Cost, High-Tech Airframe For USAF Decoy

Airborne Deployed Decoys Can Drive The Bad Guys Crazy And Protect The Good Guys If you’re on the attack in any aircraft that is less than 100 percent stealth, avoiding being >[...]

blog comments powered by Disqus



Advertisement

Advertisement

Podcasts

Advertisement

© 2007 - 2015 Web Development & Design by Pauli Systems, LC