No More Routine Flights To Space | Aero-News Network
Aero-News Network
RSS icon RSS feed
podcast icon MP3 podcast
Subscribe Aero-News e-mail Newsletter Subscribe

Airborne Unlimited -- Recent Daily Episodes

Episode Date

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Airborne On ANN

Airborne 05.23.16

Airborne 05.24.16

Airborne 05.25.16

Airborne 05.19.16

Airborne 05.20.16

Airborne Hi-Def On YouTube

Airborne 05.23.16

Airborne 05.24.16

Airborne 05.25.16

Airborne 05.19.16

Airborne 05.20.16

AEA2016 LIVE Aero-TV: 04/27-0830ET, 04/28-1400ET, 04/29-1100ET

Sun 'n Fun 2016 Innovation Preview on Vimeo!

Sun 'n Fun 2016 Innovation Preview on YouTube!

Mon, Jul 14, 2003

No More Routine Flights To Space

CAIB Recommends Shuttle Be Designated "Investigative Vehicle"

It appears more than likely that the Columbia Accident Investigation Board will force NASA to declare space shuttles as "test vehicles." The space plane, designed to carry astronauts, cargo and experiments into orbit like a rocket-powered truck, was supposed to make space flight routine. But Reuters reports the CAIB believes the shuttles are not proven operational vehicles whose performance can be predicted from one mission to the next.

"The fact that we've allowed cameras and range instrumentation and on-board instrumentation ... to kind of gracefully atrophy over the years leads me to bring this issue up, that there are some signs that it's been considered an operational vehicle rather than an investigative vehicle," said board chairman, Adm. Harold Gehman (USN, ret.) at a briefing on Friday. In essence, members of the investigative board believe NASA is playing too fast and loose with the shuttle program.

"You need to treat the launch as the first launch, each orbit as the first orbit, and each re-entry as the first re-entry," said Brig. Gen. Duane Deal, another member of the investigation board.

"The fact that this piece of foam (on Columbia's final mission) ... was much much larger than NASA's previous experience is of course important because it gets into the question of why didn't that alarm the engineers in the program," Gehman said. Perhaps more than anything else, that comment is an indication of how deep the CAIB believes NASA's management problems go.

FMI: www.caib.gov

Advertisement

More News

Icon Controversy Continues, But Icon Has Yet To Speak Up

The Company That Won't Answer Questions, May Finally Have To Do So ANN has been bombarded with info and reports concerning the health and well-being of the Icon Aircraft program...>[...]

Airborne 05.24.16: Cessna S/E Turbo-Prop, GE’s H75 Turboprop, Sonex B-Models

Also: B-29 Doc Airworthy, Aero-Calendar, Charles Taylor, Boeing-Vietjet, Flexjet Buy, Indian Mini-Shuttle, 777X Composite Wing Center Textron Aviation has finally revealed further >[...]

AeroSports Update: EAA AirVenture – What To Do…Where To Go?

Make The ‘EAA Four Corners’ Your First Stop At EAA AirVenture Oshkosh 2016 Even for those of us who have attended EAA AirVenture many times, when you first walk onto th>[...]

ANN's Daily Aero-Linx (05.25.16)

The Medallion Foundation The Medallion Foundation, a non-profit aviation safety organization, embraces mentors and advocates for all aspects of aviation: Student pilots to airline >[...]

ANN's Daily Aero-Term (05.25.16): Resolution Advisory

A display indication given to the pilot by the traffic alert and collision avoidance systems (TCAS II) recommending a maneuver to increase vertical separation relative to an intrud>[...]

blog comments powered by Disqus



Advertisement

Advertisement

Podcasts

Advertisement

© 2007 - 2016 Web Development & Design by Pauli Systems, LC