Boeing 747-8 Receives ICAO 'Heavy' Designation For Separation | Aero-News Network
Aero-News Network
RSS icon RSS feed
podcast icon MP3 podcast
Subscribe Aero-News e-mail Newsletter Subscribe

** Airborne 04.18.14--CLICK HERE! ** HD iPad-Friendly Version--Airborne 04.18.14 **
** Airborne 04.16.14--CLICK HERE! ** HD iPad-Friendly Version--Airborne 04.16.14 **
** Airborne 04.14.14--CLICK HERE! ** HD iPad-Friendly Version--Airborne 04.14.14 **

Thu, Sep 15, 2011

Boeing 747-8 Receives ICAO 'Heavy' Designation For Separation

Ruling Means Newest 747 Can Operate Under Same Separation Distance As 747-400

The International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) has ruled that Boeing's new 747-8 will be able to operate at the same separation distances as the 747-400, designated as "heavy." ICAO, a United Nations agency tasked with codifying principles and techniques for international air navigation, sent a letter to all member nations recently saying that a team of wake experts had examined flight test and simulation data, and that it determined that the 747-8 should remain in the same class as its predecessor and retain the same separation distances.

A special ICAO team of experts in the field of wake vortices from the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), the European Organization for the Safety of Air Navigation (EUROCONTROL), the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) and the manufacturer "examined flight test and simulation data and established safety case arguments for approach, landing, departure, climb/descent and cruise operations of the Boeing 747-8 relative to other aircraft," the ICAO letter said. "The safety case supports the assertion that the Boeing 747-8 is safely categorized as HEAVY. Consequently, the wake turbulence separation minima specified ... for HEAVY aircraft should be applied."

Receiving "heavy" designation and the same separation criteria as the 747-400 is an important accomplishment for the 747-8 program, said Todd Zarfos, vice president, engineering, 747 program. "We promised our customers that the 747-8 would be able to operate in the same markets and routes they use for the 747-400," he said. "We did extensive testing to show that even though the 747-8 is longer, heavier and has a bigger wingspan than the 747-400, it does not create greater wake vortex effects. That means that airports will be able to operate more efficiently and not have to slow down operations to accommodate this airplane. Combined with its lower noise footprint, the 747-8 will be a great addition to the world's airport operations."

FMI: www.icao.int

Advertisement

More News

Airborne 04.18.14: SpaceX's Historic Pad, Sikorsky Going Presidential?, EAA B17

Also: Airmen Support Pilot's Son, Beyond The Blue!, More Wrong-Way SWA Fallout, Missing WWII Airman Comes Home NASA signed an agreement with Space Exploration Technologies Corporat>[...]

Aero-News: Quote Of The Day (04.21.14)

"Based on its Platinum Forecast System 2.0, Forecast International expects production of about 1,000 UAVs of all types in 2014, with output rising to nearly 1,100 units in each of >[...]

Aero-News: Quote Of The Day (04.20.14)

"The discovery of Kepler-186f is a significant step toward finding worlds like our planet Earth. Future NASA missions, like the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite and the James >[...]

Skydive Jersey Announces Shuttle Service For 2014 Season

Removes 'Getting To The Airport' As An Excuse To Not Go Skydiving So imagine it's a beautiful day to go jump out of an airplane in the greater New York City area, but you just don'>[...]

Klyde Morris 04.21.2014

It's A Dog-Eat-Ant ... Errr ... Dog World, Klyde FMI: www.klydemorris.com>[...]

blog comments powered by Disqus



Advertisement

Advertisement

Podcasts

Advertisement

© 2007 - 2014 Web Development & Design by Pauli Systems, LC