US Airways Tells Man He Is 'Too Disabled' To Fly Alone | Aero-News Network
Aero-News Network
RSS icon RSS feed
podcast icon MP3 podcast
Subscribe Aero-News e-mail Newsletter Subscribe

** Airborne 11.21.14 ** HD iPad-Friendly -- Airborne 11.21.14 **
** Airborne 11.19.14 ** HD iPad-Friendly -- Airborne 11.19.14 **
** Airborne 11.17.14 ** HD iPad-Friendly -- Airborne 11.17.14 **

Wed, Jun 13, 2007

US Airways Tells Man He Is 'Too Disabled' To Fly Alone

Couldn't Guarantee Return Trip For Mother If She Accompanied Him

Andy Gates planned to fly to Wisconsin last week from Jacksonville, FL. He booked a flight on US Airways -- as he's done in the past -- went to the airport, checked his baggage, went through security, and waited to board like everyone else.

Just as he was preparing to board the aircraft June 6, gate agents informed him he could not board. They had determined he could not travel by himself, according to WKMG Orlando Channel 6.

"We went to the gate and they told me I could not fly... not alone," Gates said.

Gates has dystonia -- a neuro-muscular disease -- and is confined to a wheelchair.

"They said I was too disabled to fly alone. I don't have enough words to describe how angry I am." He said he felt outraged and discriminated against.

The airline manager told him he could fly if his mother, Patsy Gates, went with him.

"He says to me, 'You have six minutes to make a decision on whether to go. You can go with him or he cannot go. You have six minutes,'" she said. "Meanwhile, I am parked in a 30 minutes parking zone, and I'm having surgery tomorrow, and they did not guarantee me a way back."

Gates doesn't understand the furor -- as he's flown seven times in the past alone, even on US Airways... and hasn't had a problem.

"I have a college degree. I am completely intelligent. I can make my own decisions. I don't know why I was denied," Gates said.

The day after the incident, US Airways issued a statement that said, "US Airways personnel determined that (Gates) would not be able to assist in his own evacuation in the event of an emergency. We feel that our employees acted appropriately and followed both company and federal policy in this situation."

There is a law that says if a person has mobility impairments so severe they would not be able to assist with an evacuation, they can be denied travel. However, Gates said he could control his legs and arms enough to get into his chair, and he offered to demonstrate that to the airline.

The carrier said it would issue a refund, but it would take some time.

Gates hopes to catch a flight this weekend... on a different airline.

FMI: www.usairways.com

Advertisement

More News

Airborne 11.21.14: AEA's 3Q/14 Report, Fantasy Of Flight, Modernizing The NAS

Also: Holland Wants Gold, FAA Strangling UAVs?, RAF WWII Trainer For Sale, Bf109s Live, Georgia v Aerospace Engineers The Aircraft Electronics Association has released its third-qu>[...]

Aero-News: Quote Of The Day (11.23.14)

"Reaching this stage that we call ATLO is a critical milestone. This is a very satisfying point of the mission as we transition from many teams working on their individual elements>[...]

ANN FAQ: Getting The Most Out Of ANN's Newsletters

ANN goes through a lot of trouble to make the graphics flashy and cool and an integral part of the story. But let's face it, they're bandwidth-intensive. So here are a couple of th>[...]

Air Force Funds Research On Thermal Management Technology For Fighters

Heat Generated By Electronic Systems A Growing Challenge Managing heat that is generated by electronic subsystems in next-generation aircraft is a vexing challenge for aerospace sy>[...]

Raytheon Successfully Demonstrates Airborne Electronic Attack System

Prototype Test Flights Evaluate Integrated Electronic Warfare Capabilities The U.S. Navy and Raytheon successfully demonstrated an end to end, first of its kind, integrated electro>[...]

blog comments powered by Disqus



Advertisement

Advertisement

Podcasts

Advertisement

© 2007 - 2014 Web Development & Design by Pauli Systems, LC