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Wed, May 26, 2010

Centurion: Engines Need No Mods For FAA Carbon Monoxide SAIB

Company Says Its Mufflers Do Not Require Replacement

The FAA published a Special Airworthiness Information Bulletin (SAIB) regarding engine exhaust systems on May 7, 2010, following research that focuses on carbon monoxide (CO) safety issues as they apply to general aviation products.

They found that in accidents related to CO poisoning, the muffler system was the top source of CO leakage. Accordingly, the FAA recommended the replacement of the mufflers on airplanes powered by reciprocating engines with more than 1,000 hours on the muffler. This recommendation is not mandatory and only N-registered airplanes are affected.

In a news release, Centurion says that its engines are not affected by this recommendation. It notes that reciprocating engines with a diesel combustion process produce very small amounts of Carbon Monoxide, because the combustion runs always lean. Centurion says it has notified the FAA, which will include a note concerning diesel engines with the next revision of the SAIB.

The Swiss Federal Office of Civil Aviation (FOCA) initiated a research program in 2007 with a focus on aircraft engines emissions, and measured emissions for several reciprocating aircraft engine types, including Centurion aircraft engines (TC number TAE-125). They found out that a Lycoming O-360, for example, is producing 6,743 g/kg of CO per hour at cruise power, while the Centurion engine only produces 91 g/kg of CO per hour, or less than 1.5 percent of the gasoline engine.

In addition, Centurion says the heating system of its installations uses a heat exchanger from the liquid cooling system to heat fresh air. The exhaust system is not used, so the risk of CO entering the cabin is very low. Centurion says that, in its experience with exhaust pipes and mufflers in Centurion installations, since most parts are made from non-corrosive materials they do not show any severe corrosion after 1,000 hours.

FMI: www.centurion.aero

 


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