NTSB Releases Probable Cause In Hendricks Accident | Aero-News Network
Aero-News Network
RSS icon RSS feed
podcast icon MP3 podcast
Subscribe Aero-News e-mail Newsletter Subscribe

Airborne Unlimited -- Recent Daily Episodes

Episode Date

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Airborne On ANN

Airborne 12.05.16

Airborne 12.06.16

Airborne 12.07.16

Airborne 12.08.16

Airborne 12.09.16

Airborne Hi-Def On YouTube

Airborne 12.05.16

Airborne 12.06.16

Airborne 12.07.16

Airborne 12.08.16

Airborne 12.09.16

Tue, Feb 07, 2006

NTSB Releases Probable Cause In Hendricks Accident

Cites Crew's Failure To Properly Fly Approach

The National Transportation Safety Board released its probable cause report Tuesday on the 2004 crash of a Beech King Air operated by Hendrick Motorsports in Stuart, VA.

In its report, the NTSB cites the flight crew's failure to properly execute the published instrument approach procedure as the primary cause of the accident. Contributing to the cause of the accident was the crew's failure to use all navigational aids to confirm and monitor the airplane's position during the approach.

As was reported by Aero-News, on October 24, 2004 a Beech King Air 200 transporting eight passengers, including Hendrick Motorsports employees, and two flight crewmembers collided with mountainous terrain during a missed approach to Martinsville/Blue Ridge Airport, Martinsville, Virginia.

All 10 persons aboard the airplane died, and the aircraft was destroyed by impact forces and a post crash fire.

The flight departed Concord Regional Airport, Concord, NC (JQF) operating on instrument flight rules. Radar data shows that, after the plane was cleared for landing for a localizer runway 30 approach at Martinsville Airport (MTV), the plane did not descend at the proper point. About seven miles beyond the airport, the airplane initiated a straight- ahead climb. The airplane's radar target was lost.

The NTSB determined the missed approach should have occurred over the Martinsville Airport by executing a climbing right turn. The airplane was not equipped with a ground proximity warning system.

"The approach and missed approach procedures provide for safe operation in instrument weather conditions," said NTSB Acting Chairman Mark V. Rosenker. "It is imperative that pilots use all available navigational aids to ensure that the approach is properly flown."

FMI: www.ntsb.gov

Advertisement

More News

Airborne 12.08.16: Trump v AF1, Gordon Bennett Cup '17, Skydiving At Casa Grande

Also: Intoxicated Pilot, Seaplane Pilots, AEA/EASA, Drones As Lifesavers, ISS Update, T-50A Flight Ops, Safran President-elect, Donald Trump set the world of aviation and the media>[...]

City Of Orlando Rewrites Drone Code, Still Tries to Supplant FAA

Cites Explosive Growth Of Hobby Aircraft, Advances In Technology The City of Orlando, FL has rewritten the section of its municipal code dealing with unmanned aircraft in light of >[...]

Search Continues For Missing Marine In Japan

Ejected From F/A-18 Hornet Off The Coast Of Japan Wednesday The Marine Corps is continuing its search for a pilot who went missing after ejecting from his F/A-18 Hornet Wednesday o>[...]

Airborne 12.07.16: SpaceShipTwo Free Flt, Newest Tecnam, Hurricane Hunters Move

Also: Chelan Seaplanes Debacle, Electrifying E-Fest, Delta's New Airbus, Orion Update, ACSS NXT-700, Flyht, Duncan Aviation The newest SpaceShipTwo flew free of its mother ship for>[...]

Airborne 12.08.16: Trump v AF1, Gordon Bennett Cup '17, Skydiving At Casa Grande

Also: Intoxicated Pilot, Seaplane Pilots, AEA/EASA, Drones As Lifesavers, ISS Update, T-50A Flight Ops, Safran President-elect, Donald Trump set the world of aviation and the media>[...]

blog comments powered by Disqus



Advertisement

Advertisement

Podcasts

Advertisement

© 2007 - 2016 Web Development & Design by Pauli Systems, LC