NTSB: Delashaw's Hunter Not Airworthy | Aero-News Network
Aero-News Network
RSS icon RSS feed
podcast icon MP3 podcast
Subscribe Aero-News e-mail Newsletter Subscribe

Airborne Unlimited -- Recent Daily Episodes

Episode Date

AMA Drone Report

Airborne-Monday

Airborne-Tuesday

Airborne-Wednesday

Airborne-Thursday

Airborne-Friday

Airborne-Unmanned w/AUVSI

Airborne On ANN

AMA 04.20.17

Airborne
04.24.17

Airborne
04.25.17

Airborne
04.19.17

Airborne
04.20.17

Airborne
04.21.17

Airborne-Unmanned 04.18.17

Airborne-YouTube

AMA 04.20.17

Airborne
04.24.17

Airborne
04.25.17

Airborne
04.19.17

Airborne
04.20.17

Airborne
04.21.17

Airborne-Unmanned 04.18.17

Sun, May 09, 2004

NTSB: Delashaw's Hunter Not Airworthy

Engine change had not been signed off by mechanic

In July of 2003 we reported that Tom "Sharkbait" Delashaw had died after his Hawker Hunter crashed in Pennsylvania. The NTSB has released a report in which it states that it has found that the aircraft had had an engine change prior to the crash, and the logs had not been signed off by the mechanic to return the jet to airworthy status.

The report, published last Thursday, May 6, states in part that "According to the FAA licensed A & P mechanic who oversaw and supervised the engine change, he did not sign off any maintenance records to return the airplane to an airworthy status." The engine being swapped was an Avon 122 made by Rolls-Royce. It continues to say that the mechanic "...conducted the engine change in accordance with maintenance manuals for the airplane. He supplied a copy of the documentation used during the engine change and subsequent engine runs which showed what was conducted."

"He also reported that during engine runs, the engine was found to not meet two specific tests. The first test was engine acceleration from approach power (4,500 rpm) to maximum governed rpm (8,100 rpm). The specified time for the acceleration was 5 seconds, and he reported that it took the engine 9 seconds to complete the acceleration. The second test was engine acceleration from ground idle to the maximum governed rpm. The specified time for the acceleration was 7 to 9 seconds, and he reported that it took 14 seconds to complete the acceleration."

Additionally, the investigation found that there was no record of an application on the part of the pilot/owner for a special permit to fly the aircraft.

The NTSB has not yet issued a final report for this accident.

FMI: http://www.ntsb.gov/ntsb/brief2.asp?ev_id=20030808X01294&ntsbno=NYC03FA164&akey=1

Advertisement

More News

AMA Drone Report 04.20.17: Phantom 4 Advanced, NJ NIMBYism, AMA-DJI Team Up

Also: AUVSI XPO17 LIVE!, Steady Drone Sales, Drone v Shotgun... DJI’s new Phantom 4 Advanced offers a more powerful camera and more upgraded controls. The new upgrades the or>[...]

Airborne-Unmanned 04.18.17: Drones v Volcanoes!, Boston Marathon UAVs, XPO-LIVE!

Also: State Pavilions at XPONENTIAL, MQ-8C Fire Scout, Puma UAS, Drone Bust Drones DO wind up in some of the most amazing places... As evidence by the Universities of Bristol and C>[...]

Passenger Picks Fight With Off-Duty Pilot

Incident Captured On Surveillance Video A scuffle erupted in Terminal C at Kansas City International Airport (KCI) between a passenger and an off-duty American Airlines pilot who h>[...]

Aero-News: Quote of the Day (04.25.17)

"...safe, tested and legal to operate in the United States in uncongested areas under the Ultralight category of FAA regulations. We’ve designed our first version specificall>[...]

Airbus Helicopters Increases Engine Power On H145

Expands Flight Envelope For One-Engine-Inoperative Power Airbus has extended the flight envelope of the H145 by enhancing the helicopter’s OEI power. The acronym OEI stands f>[...]

blog comments powered by Disqus



Advertisement

Advertisement

Podcasts

Advertisement

© 2007 - 2017 Web Development & Design by Pauli Systems, LC