NTSB: Delashaw's Hunter Not Airworthy | Aero-News Network
Aero-News Network
RSS icon RSS feed
podcast icon MP3 podcast
Subscribe Aero-News e-mail Newsletter Subscribe

Airborne Unlimited -- Recent Daily Episodes

Episode Date

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Airborne On ANN

Airborne 11.28.16

Airborne 11.29.16

Airborne 11.30.16

Airborne 12.01.16

Airborne 12.02.16

Airborne Hi-Def On YouTube

Airborne 11.28.16

Airborne 11.29.16

Airborne 11.30.16

Airborne 12.01.16

Airborne 12.02.16

Sun, May 09, 2004

NTSB: Delashaw's Hunter Not Airworthy

Engine change had not been signed off by mechanic

In July of 2003 we reported that Tom "Sharkbait" Delashaw had died after his Hawker Hunter crashed in Pennsylvania. The NTSB has released a report in which it states that it has found that the aircraft had had an engine change prior to the crash, and the logs had not been signed off by the mechanic to return the jet to airworthy status.

The report, published last Thursday, May 6, states in part that "According to the FAA licensed A & P mechanic who oversaw and supervised the engine change, he did not sign off any maintenance records to return the airplane to an airworthy status." The engine being swapped was an Avon 122 made by Rolls-Royce. It continues to say that the mechanic "...conducted the engine change in accordance with maintenance manuals for the airplane. He supplied a copy of the documentation used during the engine change and subsequent engine runs which showed what was conducted."

"He also reported that during engine runs, the engine was found to not meet two specific tests. The first test was engine acceleration from approach power (4,500 rpm) to maximum governed rpm (8,100 rpm). The specified time for the acceleration was 5 seconds, and he reported that it took the engine 9 seconds to complete the acceleration. The second test was engine acceleration from ground idle to the maximum governed rpm. The specified time for the acceleration was 7 to 9 seconds, and he reported that it took 14 seconds to complete the acceleration."

Additionally, the investigation found that there was no record of an application on the part of the pilot/owner for a special permit to fly the aircraft.

The NTSB has not yet issued a final report for this accident.

FMI: http://www.ntsb.gov/ntsb/brief2.asp?ev_id=20030808X01294&ntsbno=NYC03FA164&akey=1

Advertisement

More News

Airborne 12.02.16: Stratos 714 1st Flt, TFR Politics, Airbus Job Cuts

Also: Female Skydive Record, ANN November Efforts, Dream Chaser, SecTrans Reax, FAA SAFO, Able Flight, Airline Group Grounded On November 21, the Stratos 714 very light jet took to>[...]

Aero-News: Quote of the Day (12.04.16)

“All three institutions have now sent a strong signal in favour of modernizing the Agency and the European aviation system as a whole. There is clear political will to ensure>[...]

Yingling Aviation Named Garmin Integrated Flight Deck Dealer

Wichita-Based Center Is Authorized To Sell And Install Garmin G1000 Through G5000 Avionics On Broad Range Of Business Aircraft Yingling Aviation has been named a Garmin Integrated >[...]

ANN's Daily Aero-Linx (12.04.16)

Aero Linx: The Colorado Airport Operators Association (CAOA) The Colorado Airport Operators Association (CAOA) serves the common interests of the owners, operators and users of the>[...]

ANN's Daily Aero-Term (12.04.16): Downburst

Downburst A strong downdraft which induces an outburst of damaging winds on or near the ground. Damaging winds, either straight or curved, are highly divergent. The sizes of downbu>[...]

blog comments powered by Disqus



Advertisement

Advertisement

Podcasts

Advertisement

© 2007 - 2016 Web Development & Design by Pauli Systems, LC