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Mon, Aug 28, 2006

One Hundred! Cessna Delivers 100th Citation CJ3

Cessna has just delivered the 100th Citation CJ3 to Jeffrey Mark, chief executive officer, principal owner and co-founder of Mark-Taylor Residential Inc., an Arizona-based real estate development corporation.

A pilot for 16 years, Mark learned how to fly in a Cessna 172 Skyhawk.

"I have always loved airplanes," Mark said. "When I was a kid, my father was a pilot, and I flew radio-controlled airplanes. I have kept that passion for flying."

Mark has owned a Cessna CitationJet, a Citation CJ2 and Citation CJ3.

"I like the way the Citations fly and handle," he said.

"The ability to operate these aircraft with a single pilot is important to me since I fly these jets myself. I also like the range, speed and baggage capacity, as well as the short field performance, because the airfield I fly out of most often is 3,900 feet."

He said his previous Cessnas have flown him to both U.S. coasts, Alaska, Costa Rica and Mexico, among other destinations. He said he expects this CJ3 to perform similar missions.

The Citation CJ3 received Federal Aviation Administration certification in October 2004. The CJ3 passenger cabin is 24 inches longer than the Citation CJ2+. It has a maximum cruise speed of 417 knots at 33,000 feet.

With two pilots, full fuel, four passengers and baggage, the CJ3 offers more than 1,800 nautical miles of range with NBAA IFR reserves. Service ceiling is 45,000 feet and the maximum gross takeoff weight is 13,870 pounds.

FMI: www.cessna.com

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