Scientist's Nobel Prize Caps Off A Great Week For NASA | Aero-News Network
Aero-News Network
RSS icon RSS feed
podcast icon MP3 podcast
Subscribe Aero-News e-mail Newsletter Subscribe

** Airborne 09.15.14 ** HD iPad-Friendly -- Airborne 09.15.14 **
** Airborne 09.12.14 ** HD iPad-Friendly -- Airborne 09.12.14 **
** Airborne 09.10.14 ** HD iPad-Friendly -- Airborne 09.10.14 **

Mon, Dec 11, 2006

Scientist's Nobel Prize Caps Off A Great Week For NASA

But How Many People Noticed?

After being hit with a series of setbacks over the past several years -- from the loss of three robotic spacecraft from 1999 to 2004, to the 2003 Columbia tragedy -- NASA has rebounded considerably in the past year. The past seven days, in particular, have seen several noteworthy achievements and stories that have kept the space agency in the news... and for all the right reasons.

On Sunday, agency physicist John Mather was awarded the prestigious Nobel Prize for physics. Mather works at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Maryland. He shares the prize with George Smoot of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, for uncovering evidence that helped nail down the big bang theory of the universe.

The Associated Press reports the two men based their finding on data from a NASA satellite.

Mather's win came one day after the spectacular nighttime launch of the shuttle Discovery (below), on a mission that so far appears to be going perfectly to plan.

On December 7, the White House announced the selection of microbiologist Joshua Lederberg for the Presidential Medal of Freedom. Lederberg has served as an advisor to the agency in its search for extraterrestrial life.

Last Wednesday, NASA revealed photos taken from the now-defunct Mars Global Surveyor that appear to support the agency's long-held belief that water still flows on Mars -- albeit in limited periods.

One week ago, NASA unveiled its plans for a establishing a lunar base by 2020. The agency has already seen interest from the Russian and European space agencies to help support that goal.

When asked whether NASA has ever enjoyed a week where it had as many accomplishments to tout, public affairs official David Mould replied "July 1969 comes to mind." That, of course, is the week NASA first landed on the moon.

The comparison doesn't match up completely, though. While Americans were glued to their televisions in 1969 to watch the moon landing, many of NASA's accomplishments for the past week have passed with little fanfare.

"It's a terrific week for NASA," said Syracuse University professor W. Henry Lambright. "I think the only reason it isn't better recognized is that everything in public policy is overshadowed by Iraq."

FMI: www.nasa.gov

Advertisement

More News

Airborne 09.12.14: Alan Klapmeier's $10M Win, OWW Progress, 3rd Class Update

Also: Zero-G Engine Repo, Collier Trophy, EAA Addresses FAA Hangar Use, CAF's Dallas Air Expo While it comes as no surprise to those of us that have had to deal with Cirrus Aircraf>[...]

Klyde Morris (09.15.14)

Klyde May Set A Record For The Number of People He's Gonna Tick Off With This One... FMI: www.klydemorris.com>[...]

Aero-News: Quote Of The Day (09.15.14)

“Our team organized the WWII Air Expo as a way to thank residents for welcoming the CAF to North Texas. We will fill the Dallas sky with the largest fleet of World War II bom>[...]

AeroSports Update: WhatÂ’s The Difference Between FAA And ASTM Approved Aircraft?

Sport Pilots Have A Choice Of Flying An Airplane That Is Built To FAA Standards Or To ASTM Standards, And It Helps To Understand The Difference Whether an airplane is built to FAA >[...]

Airbus Celebrates 20 Years Of The 'Beluga'

Flight Hours Per Aircraft Have Doubled Since First Flight In 1994 With its maiden flight on September 13, 1994, the popular Beluga cargo aircraft, affectionately named after the wh>[...]

blog comments powered by Disqus



Advertisement

Advertisement

Podcasts

Advertisement

© 2007 - 2014 Web Development & Design by Pauli Systems, LC