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Boeing Australia ‘Fires Up’ Engine on First Loyal Wingman Aircraft

An Artificial Intelligence-Powered Teaming Aircraft Developed For The Global Defense Market

Boeing Australia powered up the commercial turbofan engine on the first Loyal Wingman aircraft in September, as part of ground testing and preparations for first flight.

This milestone comes on the heels of Boeing completing the first unmanned Loyal Wingman aircraft for the Royal Australian Air Force earlier this year, a major step forward for the unmanned vehicle serving as the foundation for the global Boeing Airpower Teaming System, an artificial intelligence-powered teaming aircraft developed for the global defense market.

“This engine run gets us closer toward flying the first aircraft later this year and was successful thanks to the collaboration and dedication of our team,” said Dr. Shane Arnott, program director of the Boeing Airpower Teaming System.

“We’ve been able to select a very light, off-the-shelf jet engine for the unmanned system as a result of the advanced manufacturing technologies applied to the aircraft.”

The Boeing Airpower Teaming System provides a disruptive advantage for allied forces’ manned and unmanned missions.

It will:

  • Provide fighter-like performance, measuring 38 feet long and able to fly more than 2,000 nautical miles.
  • Integrate sensor packages onboard to support intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance, tactical early warning missions and more.
  • Use artificial intelligence to fly independently or in support of manned aircraft while maintaining safe distance between other aircraft.
  • Fly for the first time in 2020.
FMI: www.boeing.com/defense/airpower-teaming-system

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