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Wed, Oct 05, 2022

Back in Good Graces? Malaysia Gets IASA Cat 1

FAA Upgrades Malaysia’s Safety Assessment Rating

The FAA has noted that Malaysia has achieved an International Aviation Safety Assessment (IASA) Category 1 rating, and is in compliance with International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) standards. 

The FAA IASA program focuses on a country’s ability to adhere to international aviation safety standards and recommended practices. The standards are set by ICAO, the United Nations’ technical agency for aviation.

The FAA returned Malaysia to Category 1 status following a thorough review of its progress in improving its safety oversight processes. A Category 1 rating means the country’s civil aviation authority complies with ICAO standards.

Under a Category 1 rating, properly authorized Malaysian air carriers are permitted to serve the United States and enter into code-share agreements with U.S. carriers without limitation.

The FAA downgraded Malaysia to a Category 2 rating in November 2019 after it failed to comply with ICAO’s safety standards. A Category 2 IASA rating means the country either lacks laws or regulations necessary to oversee air carriers in accordance with minimum international standards for safety matters, such as technical expertise, trained personnel, record-keeping, or inspection procedures. A Category 2 rating permits carriers from a particular country to continue providing service to the United States, but they are not allowed to establish new routes.

Through IASA, the FAA assesses the civil aviation authorities of all countries. These air carriers have either applied to fly to the United States, currently conduct operations in the United States, or participate in code sharing arrangements with U.S. partner airlines, and makes that information available to the public. The assessments are based on ICAO safety standards.

FMI: www.faa.gov/about/initiatives/iasa

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