ATSB Publishes Update On Cessna 210 Carry-Through Spar Failure | Aero-News Network
Aero-News Network
RSS icon RSS feed
podcast icon MP3 podcast
Subscribe Aero-News e-mail Newsletter Subscribe

Airborne Unlimited -- Recent Daily Episodes

Episode Date

Airborne Unlimited-
Monday

Airborne-Unmanned w/AUVSI-
Tuesday

Airborne Unlimited-
Wednesday

AMA Drone Report-
Thursday

Airborne Unlimited-
Friday

Airborne On ANN

Airborne Unlimited-06.17.19

Airborne UnManned-06.18.19

Airborne Unlimited-06.19.19

AMA Drone Report-06.20.19

Airborne Unlimited-06.14.19

Airborne-YouTube

Airborne Unlimited-06.17.19

Airborne UnManned-06.18.19

Airborne Unlimited-06.19.19

AMA Drone Report-06.20.19

Airborne Unlimited-06.14.19

Tue, Jun 11, 2019

ATSB Publishes Update On Cessna 210 Carry-Through Spar Failure

Airplane Impacted Terrain Near Mount Isa, Queensland, On May 26

The ATSB has published an update on its investigation into the collision with terrain of Cessna 210 VH-SUX near Mount Isa, Queensland, Australia on May 26.

Evidence at the accident site indicated that the aircraft’s right wing had separated while in flight, resulting in a rapid loss of control and subsequent collision with terrain. The two pilots on board were fatally injured.

Subsequent technical examination confirmed the aircraft’s wing spar had fractured due to fatigue cracking, which reduced the spar’s structural integrity to the point where operational loads produced an overstress fracture.

“The ATSB has notified the Civil Aviation Safety Authority, the U.S. National Transportation Safety Board, the aircraft manufacturer and operator of the initial finding of fatigue cracking with the wing spar carry-through structure,” ATSB Executive Director Nat Nagy said. "The ATSB is working closely with those parties to ensure the continued safe operation of the the aircraft type."

The Cessna 210, which had been manufactured in 1976 and had accumulated over 12,000 flight hours, had been conducting a geological survey flight while flying at about 200 feet above ground level at the time of the accident.

The aircraft had been modified for geological survey work and had also been fitted with approved integral wing tip fuel tank and non-standard engine and propeller modifications.

“The ATSB notes that there is no evidence to indicate a connection between this accident and other recent investigations it has conducted involving this aircraft type,” Nagy said.

(Image provided with ATSB news release)

FMI: www.atsb.gov.au/publications/investigation_reports/2019/aair/ao-2019-026

Advertisement

More News

Gone West: ANN Mascot Anjin G Shepherd

Dear Lord... Please Help Me To Be The Person My Dog Thinks I Am We've had a rough many weeks recently... lots to do, some medical issues that would not go away... until recently (a>[...]

ANN Social Media Program (ANN-SMP) Expanded For Oshkosh 2019!

ANN Keeps Pushing Aviation Media (Kicking and Screaming) Further Into The 21st Century... ANN is, again, radically updating its social media campaign for the upcoming 2019 Oshkosh >[...]

Don't Miss This! 2019 AirVenture Innovation Preview Is Open To Space Requests

Over Half The Possible Feature Slots For the 2019 AIP Are Already Reserved... DON'T MISS OUT ON THIS? Important Update: The 2019 AirVenture Innovation Preview roster is filling up >[...]

Airborne 06.17.19: Riley Flies!, An-124s Ordered Seized, Contaminated Fuel

Also: FAA Revokes, SAIB For Collins Pro Line, EAA Chapter 534 Scholarship, AAR Airlift Penalized Some times... we forget what this aviation gig is all about... we get so wrapped up>[...]

AMA Drone Report 06.13.19: UK Drone Protest, New Amazon UAV, SafeAir Mavic

Also: Drone Safety At UAS Symposium, Microsoft FlightSim, Urban Air Mobility, Drone Airspace Webinar Model airplane pilots in the UK are taking issue with proposed drone regulation>[...]

blog comments powered by Disqus



Advertisement

Advertisement

Podcasts

Advertisement

© 2007 - 2019 Web Development & Design by Pauli Systems, LC