Fokker 100 Lighting Strike Much Worse Than Thought | Aero-News Network
Aero-News Network
RSS icon RSS feed
podcast icon MP3 podcast
Subscribe Aero-News e-mail Newsletter Subscribe

Airborne Unlimited -- Recent Daily Episodes

Episode Date

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Airborne On ANN

Airborne 09.26.16

Airborne 09.27.16

Airborne 09.28.16

Airborne 09.29.16

Airborne 09.30.16

Airborne Hi-Def On YouTube

Airborne 09.26.16

Airborne 09.27.16

Airborne 09.28.16

Airborne 09.29.16

Airborne 09.30.16

Thu, Dec 07, 2006

Fokker 100 Lighting Strike Much Worse Than Thought

Crew Lands Stricken Aircraft Despite Widespread Damage

A Fokker 100 (photo of type below) hit by lightning last December near Darwin Australia suffered more extensive damage than the crew suspected.

According to an Australian Transport Safety Bureau report, the aircraft was on its way to Darwin from Indonesia with 14 pax and 5 crew aboard.

ATC directed the crew to hold about 50 NM south of Darwin and wait for a thunderstorm to clear away from the airport. As the aircraft circled at 16,000 AGL in IMC it was struck by lightning. The crew reported they were between six and eight miles from the nearest storm cell.

A fluid low warning light for the number two hydraulic system illuminated 20 minutes later. With their attention now on the system, the crew noticed the number one system quantity also dropping.

The pilot was given priority handling and headed immediately for the airport. By the time the crew got the jet on the ground, the number one hydraulic system warning light had also illuminated.

Aside from the fluid quantity indications, the crew didn't notice anything out of the ordinary and landed the aircraft uneventfully.

A post-flight inspection revealed two fluid return lines and a hydraulic union damaged by the lighting strike. They also found two large holes in the fuselage along with some 90 other damage zones on the fuselage, landing gear doors, and wing and elevator trailing edges.

A later inspection found melting damage to the elevator control cables.

The report says the operator repaired the aircraft it was subsequently returned to service.

FMI: www.atsb.gov.au

Advertisement

More News

Airborne 09.28.16: NEW DJI Mavic!, EAA's Next STC, Sean Tucker Honored

Also: LA Times v SMO, APS UAT Program, Gordon Bennett 2016, Tucson Control Tower, Hubble Find, Southwest Airlines, Iowa State Another new small unmanned aerial system is now on the>[...]

AeroSports Update: Sean Tucker Is Honored By The CAF

Aerobatic Pilot Sean Tucker Receives The 2016 Lloyd P. Nolen Lifetime Achievement In Aviation Award Aerobatic pilot Sean D. Tucker has been named the recipient of the Lloyd P. Nole>[...]

Elon Musk Outlines Vision For Martian City

Rockets Carrying As Many As 200 People Could Leave For The Neighboring Planet In 'Decades' No one can deny that Elon Musk thinks big, and in a speech at the International Astronaut>[...]

Dutch Investigators Release Findings In MH17 Shootdown

Determines That The Missile 'Came From Russia' The Buk missile that destroyed Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 over eastern Ukraine in 2014 came from Russia, according to a Dutch-led >[...]

ForeFlight, SiriusXM Introduce Satellite Aviation Weather Service

Weather And Other Key Information Available Using The SXAR1 Portable Receiver Today ForeFlight and SiriusXM introduced SiriusXM Aviation weather service on the newest version of Fo>[...]

blog comments powered by Disqus



Advertisement

Advertisement

Podcasts

Advertisement

© 2007 - 2016 Web Development & Design by Pauli Systems, LC